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Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Antidepressive Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of the Preclinical and Clinical Literature.

Polyakova M, Schroeter ML, Elzinga BM, Holiga S, Schoenknecht P, de Kloet ER, Molendijk ML - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In humans, plasma but not serum BDNF increased following ECT (g = 0.72 vs. g = 0.14; 23 effect sizes, n = 281).There were some indications that the increase in BDNF expression was associated with behavioral changes in rodents, but not in humans.We conclude that ECS in rodents and ECT in humans increase BDNF concentrations but this is not consistently associated with changes in behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences & Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany; University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Emerging data suggest that Electro-Convulsive Treatment (ECT) may reduce depressive symptoms by increasing the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Yet, conflicting findings have been reported. For this reason we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the preclinical and clinical literature on the association between ECT treatment (ECS in animals) and changes in BDNF concentrations and their effect on behavior. In addition, regional brain expression of BDNF in mouse and human brains were compared using Allen Brain Atlas. ECS, over sham, increased BDNF mRNA and protein in animal brain (effect size [Hedge's g]: 0.38-0.54; 258 effect-size estimates, N = 4,284) but not in serum (g = 0.06, 95% CI = -0.05-0.17). In humans, plasma but not serum BDNF increased following ECT (g = 0.72 vs. g = 0.14; 23 effect sizes, n = 281). The gradient of the BDNF increment in animal brains corresponded to the gradient of the BDNF gene expression according to the Allen brain atlas. Effect-size estimates were larger following more ECT sessions in animals (r = 0.37, P < .0001) and in humans (r = 0.55; P = 0.05). There were some indications that the increase in BDNF expression was associated with behavioral changes in rodents, but not in humans. We conclude that ECS in rodents and ECT in humans increase BDNF concentrations but this is not consistently associated with changes in behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

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pone.0141564.g001: Prisma flow diagram of the search strategy and its results.

Mentions: Our search generated 97 papers of which 23 [10–11,15,33–51] fulfilled the inclusion criteria (see Fig 1 for a flow-chart). From these we could extract 280 effect-size estimates (k) on a total of 4,670 animals (mean n = 17 per effect-size, range 8–30) on changes in BDNF concentrations in animals that were subjected to ECS as compared to sham treatment or, in one case, to baseline.[31] Mean number of ECS sessions was 5 (range: 1–14). Mean time that passed between last ECS session and decapitation was 40 hours (range: 1–504 hours). We refer to Table 1 for the included studies and general information on them. S5 Table and S6 Table provide additional information on the animals that were used and the methods that were applied.


Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Antidepressive Effect of Electroconvulsive Therapy: Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses of the Preclinical and Clinical Literature.

Polyakova M, Schroeter ML, Elzinga BM, Holiga S, Schoenknecht P, de Kloet ER, Molendijk ML - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prisma flow diagram of the search strategy and its results.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631320&req=5

pone.0141564.g001: Prisma flow diagram of the search strategy and its results.
Mentions: Our search generated 97 papers of which 23 [10–11,15,33–51] fulfilled the inclusion criteria (see Fig 1 for a flow-chart). From these we could extract 280 effect-size estimates (k) on a total of 4,670 animals (mean n = 17 per effect-size, range 8–30) on changes in BDNF concentrations in animals that were subjected to ECS as compared to sham treatment or, in one case, to baseline.[31] Mean number of ECS sessions was 5 (range: 1–14). Mean time that passed between last ECS session and decapitation was 40 hours (range: 1–504 hours). We refer to Table 1 for the included studies and general information on them. S5 Table and S6 Table provide additional information on the animals that were used and the methods that were applied.

Bottom Line: In humans, plasma but not serum BDNF increased following ECT (g = 0.72 vs. g = 0.14; 23 effect sizes, n = 281).There were some indications that the increase in BDNF expression was associated with behavioral changes in rodents, but not in humans.We conclude that ECS in rodents and ECT in humans increase BDNF concentrations but this is not consistently associated with changes in behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences & Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University Hospital, Leipzig, Germany; University Hospital Leipzig, Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Emerging data suggest that Electro-Convulsive Treatment (ECT) may reduce depressive symptoms by increasing the expression of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF). Yet, conflicting findings have been reported. For this reason we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the preclinical and clinical literature on the association between ECT treatment (ECS in animals) and changes in BDNF concentrations and their effect on behavior. In addition, regional brain expression of BDNF in mouse and human brains were compared using Allen Brain Atlas. ECS, over sham, increased BDNF mRNA and protein in animal brain (effect size [Hedge's g]: 0.38-0.54; 258 effect-size estimates, N = 4,284) but not in serum (g = 0.06, 95% CI = -0.05-0.17). In humans, plasma but not serum BDNF increased following ECT (g = 0.72 vs. g = 0.14; 23 effect sizes, n = 281). The gradient of the BDNF increment in animal brains corresponded to the gradient of the BDNF gene expression according to the Allen brain atlas. Effect-size estimates were larger following more ECT sessions in animals (r = 0.37, P < .0001) and in humans (r = 0.55; P = 0.05). There were some indications that the increase in BDNF expression was associated with behavioral changes in rodents, but not in humans. We conclude that ECS in rodents and ECT in humans increase BDNF concentrations but this is not consistently associated with changes in behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus