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Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cholangiocarcinoma: an updated meta-analysis.

Li J, Han T, Xu L, Luan X - Prz Gastroenterol (2015)

Bottom Line: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included fifteen case-control studies and five cohort studies from Asia (n = 11), the United States (n = 5), and Europe (n = 4).The funnel plot revealed no evidence for publication bias concerning diabetes and the risk of CC (including ICC and ECC).This relationship needs to be confirmed by further follow-up studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong, China ; Department of Gastroenterology, Tai'an Central Hospital, Tai'an, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A number of studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is implicated in susceptibility to several cancers. However, the relationship between diabetes and cholangiocarcinoma remain unclear.

Aim: To quantitatively assess the relationship between diabetes and incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in cohort and case-control studies.

Material and methods: A literature search was performed for entries from 1996 to 2014 using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Studies were included if they reported odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% CI of cholangiocarcinoma with respect to diabetes mellitus.

Results: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included fifteen case-control studies and five cohort studies from Asia (n = 11), the United States (n = 5), and Europe (n = 4). Compared with individuals without diabetes, the pooled OR of cholangiocarcinoma was 1.74 (95% CI: 1.62-1.87, p = 0.568 for heterogeneity) for patients with diabetes, ICC (summary RR, 1.93; 95% CI: 1.65-2.25; p = 0.037 for heterogeneity), and ECC (summary RR, 1.66; 95% CI: 1.39-1.98; p = 0.001 for heterogeneity). The funnel plot revealed no evidence for publication bias concerning diabetes and the risk of CC (including ICC and ECC).

Conclusions: The findings from this meta-analysis suggest that diabetes may increase the risk of cholangiocarcinoma. This relationship needs to be confirmed by further follow-up studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot of the relationship between DM and ECC risk in case-controlled studies and cohort studies
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Figure 0002: Forest plot of the relationship between DM and ECC risk in case-controlled studies and cohort studies

Mentions: We identified 12 studies (7 case-controlled and five cohort studies) that presented results on diabetes and risk of ECC (Figure 2). Of these, 7 studies found an increased risk of ECC in patients with diabetes [21, 27, 33, 36, 37], and in another five studies positive relationships were not found [22, 26, 30, 34, 35]. In the analysis of all studies, the summary RR of ECC were 1.66 (95% CI: 1.39–1.98; p = 0.001 for heterogeneity) in a random-effects model for those with diabetes compared with those without diabetes, with evidence of significant heterogeneity among studies (Q = 31.42, p = 0.001, I2 = 65%). We then conducted subgroup meta-analyses by geographic area and study design (Table III). The summary RR of the associations between diabetes and ECC risk were similar for cohort studies and case-controlled studies (summary RR (95% CI) 1.61 (1.14–2.29), in cohort studies and 1.66 (1.32–2.1) in case-controlled studies, respectively). We conducted subgroup analysis by geographic area (Figure 3). A significant association between DM and ECC risk was found in studies conducted in non-Asian regions (the USA and Europe) (summary RR, 1.62; 95% CI: 1.32–2.00) and in Asia (summary RR, 1.60; 95% CI: 1.01–2.54).


Diabetes mellitus and the risk of cholangiocarcinoma: an updated meta-analysis.

Li J, Han T, Xu L, Luan X - Prz Gastroenterol (2015)

Forest plot of the relationship between DM and ECC risk in case-controlled studies and cohort studies
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631269&req=5

Figure 0002: Forest plot of the relationship between DM and ECC risk in case-controlled studies and cohort studies
Mentions: We identified 12 studies (7 case-controlled and five cohort studies) that presented results on diabetes and risk of ECC (Figure 2). Of these, 7 studies found an increased risk of ECC in patients with diabetes [21, 27, 33, 36, 37], and in another five studies positive relationships were not found [22, 26, 30, 34, 35]. In the analysis of all studies, the summary RR of ECC were 1.66 (95% CI: 1.39–1.98; p = 0.001 for heterogeneity) in a random-effects model for those with diabetes compared with those without diabetes, with evidence of significant heterogeneity among studies (Q = 31.42, p = 0.001, I2 = 65%). We then conducted subgroup meta-analyses by geographic area and study design (Table III). The summary RR of the associations between diabetes and ECC risk were similar for cohort studies and case-controlled studies (summary RR (95% CI) 1.61 (1.14–2.29), in cohort studies and 1.66 (1.32–2.1) in case-controlled studies, respectively). We conducted subgroup analysis by geographic area (Figure 3). A significant association between DM and ECC risk was found in studies conducted in non-Asian regions (the USA and Europe) (summary RR, 1.62; 95% CI: 1.32–2.00) and in Asia (summary RR, 1.60; 95% CI: 1.01–2.54).

Bottom Line: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included fifteen case-control studies and five cohort studies from Asia (n = 11), the United States (n = 5), and Europe (n = 4).The funnel plot revealed no evidence for publication bias concerning diabetes and the risk of CC (including ICC and ECC).This relationship needs to be confirmed by further follow-up studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, Shandong Provincial Hospital, Shandong University, Shandong, China ; Department of Gastroenterology, Tai'an Central Hospital, Tai'an, Shandong, China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A number of studies have shown that diabetes mellitus is implicated in susceptibility to several cancers. However, the relationship between diabetes and cholangiocarcinoma remain unclear.

Aim: To quantitatively assess the relationship between diabetes and incidence of cholangiocarcinoma in cohort and case-control studies.

Material and methods: A literature search was performed for entries from 1996 to 2014 using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Studies were included if they reported odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% CI of cholangiocarcinoma with respect to diabetes mellitus.

Results: Twenty studies met the inclusion criteria, which included fifteen case-control studies and five cohort studies from Asia (n = 11), the United States (n = 5), and Europe (n = 4). Compared with individuals without diabetes, the pooled OR of cholangiocarcinoma was 1.74 (95% CI: 1.62-1.87, p = 0.568 for heterogeneity) for patients with diabetes, ICC (summary RR, 1.93; 95% CI: 1.65-2.25; p = 0.037 for heterogeneity), and ECC (summary RR, 1.66; 95% CI: 1.39-1.98; p = 0.001 for heterogeneity). The funnel plot revealed no evidence for publication bias concerning diabetes and the risk of CC (including ICC and ECC).

Conclusions: The findings from this meta-analysis suggest that diabetes may increase the risk of cholangiocarcinoma. This relationship needs to be confirmed by further follow-up studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus