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Lichen planopilaris epidemiology: a retrospective study of 80 cases.

Soares VC, Mulinari-Brenner F, Souza TE - An Bras Dermatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Prototype II was seen in 53 (66,25%) patients.Frontal fibrosing alopecia was seen in 31% of the patients and only one patient presented Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS).Scalp lesions were scattered throughout the scalp in 47 (58,75%) of the patients, while 24 (30%) presented mainly central scalp lesions, 29 (36,25%) presented marginal lesions and only 4 (5%) patents had vertex lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal do ParanĂ¡, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Abstract

Background: Lichen planopilaris is a frequent presentation of primary cicatricial alopecia. Scalp distribution characterizes the main clinical presentations: classic lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS).

Objective: Description of the clinical, dermoscopic and histopathological findings of Lichen planopilaris in public and private practices.

Method: A retrospective observational study was performed by reviewing medical records of patients with lichen planopilaris.

Results: Eighty patients were included, 73 (91,25%) were female. Prototype II was seen in 53 (66,25%) patients. Classic lichen planopilaris was seen in 62,5% of the cases. Frontal fibrosing alopecia was seen in 31% of the patients and only one patient presented Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS). Scalp lesions were scattered throughout the scalp in 47 (58,75%) of the patients, while 24 (30%) presented mainly central scalp lesions, 29 (36,25%) presented marginal lesions and only 4 (5%) patents had vertex lesions.

Conclusions: Clinical presentation of Lichen planopilaris varies. To recognize the heterogeneity of the clinical appearance in lichen planopilaris is important for differential diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient with fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution showing confluentalopecia plaques in the central region of the scalp
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f03: Patient with fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution showing confluentalopecia plaques in the central region of the scalp

Mentions: In the classic LPP group it was possible to characterize 2 distinct clinical features.One group with confluent random plaques distributed throughout the scalp and other withconfluent plaques in the central region of the scalp, clinically similar to male patternor female pattern androgenetic alopecia, what is called fibrosing alopecia in a patterndistribution (FAPD). This variant has increasingly been described as a variation of LPP;although clinically similar to male pattern or female pattern androgenetic alopecia, theperifollicular linchenoid inflammatory process histologically characterizes this entity(Figure 3).7 Both in FFA as in FAPD the trigger for lichenoid process seems tobe associated with the miniaturization of the follicles.1


Lichen planopilaris epidemiology: a retrospective study of 80 cases.

Soares VC, Mulinari-Brenner F, Souza TE - An Bras Dermatol (2015)

Patient with fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution showing confluentalopecia plaques in the central region of the scalp
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631232&req=5

f03: Patient with fibrosing alopecia in a pattern distribution showing confluentalopecia plaques in the central region of the scalp
Mentions: In the classic LPP group it was possible to characterize 2 distinct clinical features.One group with confluent random plaques distributed throughout the scalp and other withconfluent plaques in the central region of the scalp, clinically similar to male patternor female pattern androgenetic alopecia, what is called fibrosing alopecia in a patterndistribution (FAPD). This variant has increasingly been described as a variation of LPP;although clinically similar to male pattern or female pattern androgenetic alopecia, theperifollicular linchenoid inflammatory process histologically characterizes this entity(Figure 3).7 Both in FFA as in FAPD the trigger for lichenoid process seems tobe associated with the miniaturization of the follicles.1

Bottom Line: Prototype II was seen in 53 (66,25%) patients.Frontal fibrosing alopecia was seen in 31% of the patients and only one patient presented Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS).Scalp lesions were scattered throughout the scalp in 47 (58,75%) of the patients, while 24 (30%) presented mainly central scalp lesions, 29 (36,25%) presented marginal lesions and only 4 (5%) patents had vertex lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Federal do ParanĂ¡, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Abstract

Background: Lichen planopilaris is a frequent presentation of primary cicatricial alopecia. Scalp distribution characterizes the main clinical presentations: classic lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS).

Objective: Description of the clinical, dermoscopic and histopathological findings of Lichen planopilaris in public and private practices.

Method: A retrospective observational study was performed by reviewing medical records of patients with lichen planopilaris.

Results: Eighty patients were included, 73 (91,25%) were female. Prototype II was seen in 53 (66,25%) patients. Classic lichen planopilaris was seen in 62,5% of the cases. Frontal fibrosing alopecia was seen in 31% of the patients and only one patient presented Graham-Little Piccardi-Lassueur Syndrome (GLPLS). Scalp lesions were scattered throughout the scalp in 47 (58,75%) of the patients, while 24 (30%) presented mainly central scalp lesions, 29 (36,25%) presented marginal lesions and only 4 (5%) patents had vertex lesions.

Conclusions: Clinical presentation of Lichen planopilaris varies. To recognize the heterogeneity of the clinical appearance in lichen planopilaris is important for differential diagnosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus