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Coccidioidomycosis and the skin: a comprehensive review.

Garcia Garcia SC, Salas Alanis JC, Flores MG, Gonzalez Gonzalez SE, Vera Cabrera L, Ocampo Candiani J - An Bras Dermatol (2015)

Bottom Line: Coccidioides species live in arid and semi-arid regions, causing mainly pulmonary infection through inhalation of arthroconidia although many other organs can be affected.Primary inoculation is rare.Since the first case of coccidioidomycosis was reported in 1892, the skin has been identified as an important target of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
AbstractCoccidioidomycosis is a highly prevalent disease in the Western hemisphere. It is considered one of the most virulent primary fungal infections. Coccidioides species live in arid and semi-arid regions, causing mainly pulmonary infection through inhalation of arthroconidia although many other organs can be affected. Primary inoculation is rare. Since the first case of coccidioidomycosis was reported in 1892, the skin has been identified as an important target of this disease. Knowledge of cutaneous clinical forms of this infection is important and very useful for establishing prompt diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of this infection, emphasizing its cutaneous manifestations, diagnostic methods and current treatment.

No MeSH data available.


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Primary coccidioidomycosis presenting as lesions in a typical sporothricoidpattern
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f09: Primary coccidioidomycosis presenting as lesions in a typical sporothricoidpattern

Mentions: Primary cutaneous infection is extremely rare, with about 25 cases previouslyreported in the literature since 1926. It is usually seen in adults, although a fewcases have been reported in children.66 It results from direct traumatic inoculation of the organism intothe skin by an external source and typically manifests as a painless, induratednodule with ulceration (chancroid lesion) on an extremity.5 Secondary nodules may arise in a linear lymphaticsporotrichoid distribution (Figure9).67 In 1953, Wilsonet al established diagnostic criteria for primary cutaneous coccidioidomycosis,including: absence of pulmonary disease, clear evidence of traumatic inoculation, anincubation period of 1 to 3 weeks, a chancriform lesion with a painless, ulceratednodule or plaque; an early positive precipitin reaction, an early positivecoccidioidin skin test, a negative or low complement fixation reaction, the presenceof lymphadenopathy and sporotrichoid nodules, and spontaneous healing after someweeks.68 Presence ofgranulomas containing the spherules of the fungus is observed. Prognosis of this formof coccidioidomycosis is often excellent, usually with spontaneousresolution.69


Coccidioidomycosis and the skin: a comprehensive review.

Garcia Garcia SC, Salas Alanis JC, Flores MG, Gonzalez Gonzalez SE, Vera Cabrera L, Ocampo Candiani J - An Bras Dermatol (2015)

Primary coccidioidomycosis presenting as lesions in a typical sporothricoidpattern
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631225&req=5

f09: Primary coccidioidomycosis presenting as lesions in a typical sporothricoidpattern
Mentions: Primary cutaneous infection is extremely rare, with about 25 cases previouslyreported in the literature since 1926. It is usually seen in adults, although a fewcases have been reported in children.66 It results from direct traumatic inoculation of the organism intothe skin by an external source and typically manifests as a painless, induratednodule with ulceration (chancroid lesion) on an extremity.5 Secondary nodules may arise in a linear lymphaticsporotrichoid distribution (Figure9).67 In 1953, Wilsonet al established diagnostic criteria for primary cutaneous coccidioidomycosis,including: absence of pulmonary disease, clear evidence of traumatic inoculation, anincubation period of 1 to 3 weeks, a chancriform lesion with a painless, ulceratednodule or plaque; an early positive precipitin reaction, an early positivecoccidioidin skin test, a negative or low complement fixation reaction, the presenceof lymphadenopathy and sporotrichoid nodules, and spontaneous healing after someweeks.68 Presence ofgranulomas containing the spherules of the fungus is observed. Prognosis of this formof coccidioidomycosis is often excellent, usually with spontaneousresolution.69

Bottom Line: Coccidioides species live in arid and semi-arid regions, causing mainly pulmonary infection through inhalation of arthroconidia although many other organs can be affected.Primary inoculation is rare.Since the first case of coccidioidomycosis was reported in 1892, the skin has been identified as an important target of this disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital Universitario Dr. José Eleuterio González, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Monterrey, Mexico.

ABSTRACT
AbstractCoccidioidomycosis is a highly prevalent disease in the Western hemisphere. It is considered one of the most virulent primary fungal infections. Coccidioides species live in arid and semi-arid regions, causing mainly pulmonary infection through inhalation of arthroconidia although many other organs can be affected. Primary inoculation is rare. Since the first case of coccidioidomycosis was reported in 1892, the skin has been identified as an important target of this disease. Knowledge of cutaneous clinical forms of this infection is important and very useful for establishing prompt diagnosis and treatment. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of this infection, emphasizing its cutaneous manifestations, diagnostic methods and current treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus