Limits...
Are electronic nicotine delivery systems an effective smoking cessation tool?

Lam C, West A - Can J Respir Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: The primary outcome measured in all studies was self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking.In three of the four studies, self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking was verified by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide.In the remaining study, the primary outcome measured was self-reported desire to smoke and measured desire to smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have estimated that 21% of all deaths over the past decade are due to smoking, making it the leading cause of premature death in Canada. To date, many steps have been taken to eradicate the global epidemic of tobacco smoking. Most recently, electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) have become a popular smoking cessation tool. ENDS do not burn or use tobacco leaves, but instead vapourize a solution the user then inhales. The main constituents of the solution, in addition to nicotine when nicotine is present, are propylene glycol, with or without glycerol and flavouring agents. Currently, ENDS are not regulated, and have become a controversial topic.

Objectives: To determine whether ENDS are an effective smoking cessation tool.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in February 2015 using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection. Randomized controlled trials were the only publications included in the search. A secondary search was conducted by reviewing the references of relevant publications.

Results: After conducting the primary and secondary search, 109 publications were identified. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria through abstract and full-text review, four publications were included in the present literature review. A low risk of bias was established for each included study using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias evaluation framework.

Discussion: The primary outcome measured in all studies was self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking. In three of the four studies, self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking was verified by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide. In the remaining study, the primary outcome measured was self-reported desire to smoke and measured desire to smoke. All four studies showed promise that ENDS are an effective smoking cessation tool.

Conclusions: While all publications included in the present review revealed that ENDS are effective smoking cessation aid, further evaluation of the potential health effects in long-term use of ENDS remains vital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Search flow diagram outlining the process for citation identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion in the present systematic review
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631136&req=5

f1-cjrt-51-93: Search flow diagram outlining the process for citation identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion in the present systematic review

Mentions: The primary search in three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection) identified 109 articles. The secondary search reviewed the references of related articles through which one additional article was identified. Of the articles retrieved through the primary and secondary searches, 22 were determined to be duplicate citations. Through preliminary abstract review, 74 publications were determined to not be relevant to the research question, and seven publications were excluded because they did not use an RCT design. Figure 1 provides an overview of the study selection process. Each of the four included publications met all requirements for maximum scoring pursuant to the Cochrane Collaborative risk of bias evaluation framework and are summarized in Table 1.


Are electronic nicotine delivery systems an effective smoking cessation tool?

Lam C, West A - Can J Respir Ther (2015)

Search flow diagram outlining the process for citation identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion in the present systematic review
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631136&req=5

f1-cjrt-51-93: Search flow diagram outlining the process for citation identification, screening, eligibility and inclusion in the present systematic review
Mentions: The primary search in three databases (PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection) identified 109 articles. The secondary search reviewed the references of related articles through which one additional article was identified. Of the articles retrieved through the primary and secondary searches, 22 were determined to be duplicate citations. Through preliminary abstract review, 74 publications were determined to not be relevant to the research question, and seven publications were excluded because they did not use an RCT design. Figure 1 provides an overview of the study selection process. Each of the four included publications met all requirements for maximum scoring pursuant to the Cochrane Collaborative risk of bias evaluation framework and are summarized in Table 1.

Bottom Line: The primary outcome measured in all studies was self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking.In three of the four studies, self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking was verified by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide.In the remaining study, the primary outcome measured was self-reported desire to smoke and measured desire to smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Therapy, College of Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have estimated that 21% of all deaths over the past decade are due to smoking, making it the leading cause of premature death in Canada. To date, many steps have been taken to eradicate the global epidemic of tobacco smoking. Most recently, electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) have become a popular smoking cessation tool. ENDS do not burn or use tobacco leaves, but instead vapourize a solution the user then inhales. The main constituents of the solution, in addition to nicotine when nicotine is present, are propylene glycol, with or without glycerol and flavouring agents. Currently, ENDS are not regulated, and have become a controversial topic.

Objectives: To determine whether ENDS are an effective smoking cessation tool.

Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in February 2015 using the following databases: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science Core Collection. Randomized controlled trials were the only publications included in the search. A secondary search was conducted by reviewing the references of relevant publications.

Results: After conducting the primary and secondary search, 109 publications were identified. After applying all inclusion and exclusion criteria through abstract and full-text review, four publications were included in the present literature review. A low risk of bias was established for each included study using the Cochrane Collaboration risk of bias evaluation framework.

Discussion: The primary outcome measured in all studies was self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking. In three of the four studies, self-reported abstinence or reduction from smoking was verified by measuring exhaled carbon monoxide. In the remaining study, the primary outcome measured was self-reported desire to smoke and measured desire to smoke. All four studies showed promise that ENDS are an effective smoking cessation tool.

Conclusions: While all publications included in the present review revealed that ENDS are effective smoking cessation aid, further evaluation of the potential health effects in long-term use of ENDS remains vital.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus