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Four cases of cell cannibalism in highly malignant feline and canine tumors.

Ferreira FC, Soares MJ, Carvalho S, Borralho L, Vicente G, Branco S, Correia J, Peleteiro MC - Diagn Pathol (2015)

Bottom Line: Four cases of tumors in which cell internalization was frequently visualized are reported: one feline mammary carcinoma, one feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one canine pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and one canine pleural mesothelioma.Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin was positive for both internalized and host cells, while E-cadherin expression was frequently absent, although internalized cells occasionally stained positive.This cell-to-cell interaction seems to be associated with tumors displaying a strong epithelial-mesenchymal transitional phenotype, in which cancer cells become engulfed by other cancer cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CIISA, Interdisciplinary Centre of Research in Animal Health, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477, Lisbon, Portugal. fernandof@fmv.ulisboa.pt.

ABSTRACT
Four cases of tumors in which cell internalization was frequently visualized are reported: one feline mammary carcinoma, one feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one canine pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and one canine pleural mesothelioma. Cell internalization was observed by cytology in two of these cases (the feline mammary tumour and the pleural effusion in the canine mesothelioma) and by histopathology in all but the canine mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin was positive for both internalized and host cells, while E-cadherin expression was frequently absent, although internalized cells occasionally stained positive. This cell-to-cell interaction seems to be associated with tumors displaying a strong epithelial-mesenchymal transitional phenotype, in which cancer cells become engulfed by other cancer cells. Such event could be regarded as an important hallmark of very high malignancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Case 4. Mesothelioma. Pleural cavity. Dog. a - Pleural effusion cytology smear showing frequent images of cellular internalization (arrows) (Giemsa). b – Large mediastinal mass can be seen together with various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura (arrows). c – Part of the tumor (upper left) was organized in variably sized lobules limited by trabeculae of fibrous tissue, formed by loosely arranged cells almost devoid of cytoplasm, with round nuclei. Extensive necrosis is visible, possibly due to chemotherapy. In other areas (lower right) the tissue is organized in single layers of epithelial cells covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. d - IHC, anti-pancytokeratin antibody. Only the cells of the epithelial component are positive. Mayer’s hematoxylin counterstain
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Fig4: Case 4. Mesothelioma. Pleural cavity. Dog. a - Pleural effusion cytology smear showing frequent images of cellular internalization (arrows) (Giemsa). b – Large mediastinal mass can be seen together with various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura (arrows). c – Part of the tumor (upper left) was organized in variably sized lobules limited by trabeculae of fibrous tissue, formed by loosely arranged cells almost devoid of cytoplasm, with round nuclei. Extensive necrosis is visible, possibly due to chemotherapy. In other areas (lower right) the tissue is organized in single layers of epithelial cells covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. d - IHC, anti-pancytokeratin antibody. Only the cells of the epithelial component are positive. Mayer’s hematoxylin counterstain

Mentions: An 11-year-old intact female Boxer was presented with a severe pleural effusion (1500 mL). The cytological diagnosis of the effusion was of neoplasia with pleural dissemination with no clear distinction between carcinoma and mesothelioma. Frequent images of cellular internalization were present in the smears (Fig. 4a). The dog started chemotherapy with intrathoracic carboplatin but the pleural effusion persisted. Four weeks after the first presentation the dog was euthanized at the owner’s request. Upon necropsy, a large mediastinal mass (11x4x4 cm) was identified as well as various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura and diaphragm (Fig. 4b). Tissue samples were collected and treated for routine histological processing. Histology of the mediastinal mass revealed a poorly demarcated neoplasia infiltrating the adipose tissue displaying extensive areas of necrosis. The tumor organization involved two different types of tissues (Fig. 3c) with loosely arranged cells suggesting a sarcomatoid neoplasia and others of epithelial nature with cells organized in single layers covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. Tumor tissue in the small nodules in the parietal pleura and diaphragm was mostly formed by lobules of loosely arranged sarcomatoid cells. The diagnosis was of pleural multicystic biphasic mesothelioma disseminated through the pleural cavity with severe pleural effusion showing frequent images of cell internalization.Fig. 4


Four cases of cell cannibalism in highly malignant feline and canine tumors.

Ferreira FC, Soares MJ, Carvalho S, Borralho L, Vicente G, Branco S, Correia J, Peleteiro MC - Diagn Pathol (2015)

Case 4. Mesothelioma. Pleural cavity. Dog. a - Pleural effusion cytology smear showing frequent images of cellular internalization (arrows) (Giemsa). b – Large mediastinal mass can be seen together with various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura (arrows). c – Part of the tumor (upper left) was organized in variably sized lobules limited by trabeculae of fibrous tissue, formed by loosely arranged cells almost devoid of cytoplasm, with round nuclei. Extensive necrosis is visible, possibly due to chemotherapy. In other areas (lower right) the tissue is organized in single layers of epithelial cells covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. d - IHC, anti-pancytokeratin antibody. Only the cells of the epithelial component are positive. Mayer’s hematoxylin counterstain
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4631112&req=5

Fig4: Case 4. Mesothelioma. Pleural cavity. Dog. a - Pleural effusion cytology smear showing frequent images of cellular internalization (arrows) (Giemsa). b – Large mediastinal mass can be seen together with various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura (arrows). c – Part of the tumor (upper left) was organized in variably sized lobules limited by trabeculae of fibrous tissue, formed by loosely arranged cells almost devoid of cytoplasm, with round nuclei. Extensive necrosis is visible, possibly due to chemotherapy. In other areas (lower right) the tissue is organized in single layers of epithelial cells covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. d - IHC, anti-pancytokeratin antibody. Only the cells of the epithelial component are positive. Mayer’s hematoxylin counterstain
Mentions: An 11-year-old intact female Boxer was presented with a severe pleural effusion (1500 mL). The cytological diagnosis of the effusion was of neoplasia with pleural dissemination with no clear distinction between carcinoma and mesothelioma. Frequent images of cellular internalization were present in the smears (Fig. 4a). The dog started chemotherapy with intrathoracic carboplatin but the pleural effusion persisted. Four weeks after the first presentation the dog was euthanized at the owner’s request. Upon necropsy, a large mediastinal mass (11x4x4 cm) was identified as well as various small nodules dispersed throughout the parietal pleura and diaphragm (Fig. 4b). Tissue samples were collected and treated for routine histological processing. Histology of the mediastinal mass revealed a poorly demarcated neoplasia infiltrating the adipose tissue displaying extensive areas of necrosis. The tumor organization involved two different types of tissues (Fig. 3c) with loosely arranged cells suggesting a sarcomatoid neoplasia and others of epithelial nature with cells organized in single layers covering papillary infoldings into cystic spaces filled with acidophilic content. Tumor tissue in the small nodules in the parietal pleura and diaphragm was mostly formed by lobules of loosely arranged sarcomatoid cells. The diagnosis was of pleural multicystic biphasic mesothelioma disseminated through the pleural cavity with severe pleural effusion showing frequent images of cell internalization.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Four cases of tumors in which cell internalization was frequently visualized are reported: one feline mammary carcinoma, one feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one canine pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and one canine pleural mesothelioma.Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin was positive for both internalized and host cells, while E-cadherin expression was frequently absent, although internalized cells occasionally stained positive.This cell-to-cell interaction seems to be associated with tumors displaying a strong epithelial-mesenchymal transitional phenotype, in which cancer cells become engulfed by other cancer cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CIISA, Interdisciplinary Centre of Research in Animal Health, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. da Universidade Técnica, 1300-477, Lisbon, Portugal. fernandof@fmv.ulisboa.pt.

ABSTRACT
Four cases of tumors in which cell internalization was frequently visualized are reported: one feline mammary carcinoma, one feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, one canine pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma and one canine pleural mesothelioma. Cell internalization was observed by cytology in two of these cases (the feline mammary tumour and the pleural effusion in the canine mesothelioma) and by histopathology in all but the canine mesothelioma. Immunohistochemical staining for pancytokeratin was positive for both internalized and host cells, while E-cadherin expression was frequently absent, although internalized cells occasionally stained positive. This cell-to-cell interaction seems to be associated with tumors displaying a strong epithelial-mesenchymal transitional phenotype, in which cancer cells become engulfed by other cancer cells. Such event could be regarded as an important hallmark of very high malignancy.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus