Limits...
The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination.

Xu M, Wang G, Li X, Cai X, Li X, Christie P, Zhang J - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed.The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination.Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

No MeSH data available.


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Locations and satellite maps of the studied mountain areas in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.
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Figure 1: Locations and satellite maps of the studied mountain areas in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.

Mentions: In the present study we investigated plant carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in two cold and humid montane regions, Mount Gongga and Mount Segrila, both of which are located on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Figure 1). As precipitation is abundant in both regions, water availability can be ruled out as a limiting factor, thereby leaving temperature to be the predominant control for growth of local plants. Our objective was to assess whether or not temperature can exert a dominant impact on carbon isotope discrimination of plants growing in cold and humid montane regions.


The key factor limiting plant growth in cold and humid alpine areas also plays a dominant role in plant carbon isotope discrimination.

Xu M, Wang G, Li X, Cai X, Li X, Christie P, Zhang J - Front Plant Sci (2015)

Locations and satellite maps of the studied mountain areas in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4630956&req=5

Figure 1: Locations and satellite maps of the studied mountain areas in Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, China.
Mentions: In the present study we investigated plant carbon isotope composition (δ13C) in two cold and humid montane regions, Mount Gongga and Mount Segrila, both of which are located on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (Figure 1). As precipitation is abundant in both regions, water availability can be ruled out as a limiting factor, thereby leaving temperature to be the predominant control for growth of local plants. Our objective was to assess whether or not temperature can exert a dominant impact on carbon isotope discrimination of plants growing in cold and humid montane regions.

Bottom Line: However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed.The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination.Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Resources and Environmental Sciences, China Agricultural University Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Many environmental factors affect carbon isotope discrimination in plants, yet the predominant factor influencing this process is generally assumed to be the key growth-limiting factor. However, to our knowledge this hypothesis has not been confirmed. We therefore determined the carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of plants growing in two cold and humid mountain regions where temperature is considered to be the key growth-limiting factor. Mean annual temperature (MAT) showed a significant impact on variation in carbon isotope discrimination value (Δ) irrespective of study area or plant functional type with either partial correlation or regression analysis, but the correlation between Δ and soil water content (SWC) was usually not significant. In multiple stepwise regression analysis, MAT was either the first or the only variable selected into the prediction model of Δ against MAT and SWC, indicating that the effect of temperature on carbon isotope discrimination was predominant. The results therefore provide evidence that the key growth-limiting factor is also crucial for plant carbon isotope discrimination. Changes in leaf morphology, water viscosity and carboxylation efficiency with temperature may be responsible for the observed positive correlation between Δ and temperature.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus