Limits...
CXCL4 Plasma Levels Are Not Associated with the Extent of Coronary Artery Disease or with Coronary Plaque Morphology.

Erbel C, Korosoglou G, Ler P, Akhavanpoor M, Domschke G, Linden F, Doesch AO, Buss SJ, Giannitsis E, Katus HA, Gleissner CA - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that increased CXCL4 plasma levels may be associated with features of plaque instability resulting in adverse cardiovascular events.There was no significant correlation between CXCL4 levels and any clinical or demographic parameters including cardiovascular risk factors.Subgroup analysis of patients with CAD as confirmed by CCTA did not show any association of CXCL4 levels with the extent of CAD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Heidelberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: CXCL4 is a platelet chemokine released at micromolar concentrations upon platelet activation. CXCL4 has been shown to promote atherogenesis by various mechanisms. However, data on CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with coronary artery disease are largely inconclusive. Computed coronary artery angiography (CCTA) represents an excellent tool to quantify and characterize coronary atherosclerotic plaques. We hypothesized that increased CXCL4 plasma levels may be associated with features of plaque instability resulting in adverse cardiovascular events. Specifically, we sought to determine whether CXCL4 levels are correlated with specific features of coronary artery disease including (1) plaque volume, (2) calcium score, (3) degree of stenosis, or (4) vascular remodeling.

Methods and results: CXCL4 plasma levels were measured by ELISA in 217 patients undergoing CCTA for suspected CAD (mean age 64.2 ± 9.4 years, 107 (49.3%) male). Mean CXCL4 plasma levels were 12.5 ± 4.6 ng/mL. There was no significant correlation between CXCL4 levels and any clinical or demographic parameters including cardiovascular risk factors. CXCL4 plasma levels did not differ between patient with or without coronary artery disease (CAD: 12.5 ± 4.5 ng/ml, no CAD: 12.5 ± 4.8 ng/ml). Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis showed an association between CXCL4 levels and plaque volume, total calcium score, degree of stenosis, or vascular remodeling. Subgroup analysis of patients with CAD as confirmed by CCTA did not show any association of CXCL4 levels with the extent of CAD.

Conclusions: While CXCL4 may be present and active within the arterial wall, local increase of CXCL4 may not translate into systemically elevated CXCL4 levels. Further studies will have to test whether CXCL4 may still represent a suitable therapeutic target in human atherosclerosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with or without CAD.CXCL4 plasma levels as measured by ELISA in 217 individuals undergoing coronary computed-tomography angiography (CCTA) divided by „no CAD”(n = 107) and „CAD”(n = 110). For each group, box whisker plots and dot plots are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629911&req=5

pone.0141693.g001: CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with or without CAD.CXCL4 plasma levels as measured by ELISA in 217 individuals undergoing coronary computed-tomography angiography (CCTA) divided by „no CAD”(n = 107) and „CAD”(n = 110). For each group, box whisker plots and dot plots are shown.

Mentions: CXCL4 plasma levels did not differ between patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD: 12.5 ± 4.5 ng/ml, no CAD: 12.5 ± 4.8 ng/ml; Fig 1). In addition, when looking at specific features such as plaque volume, total calcium score, degree of stenosis, or vascular remodeling, no association was seen with CXCL4 levels (Table 2).


CXCL4 Plasma Levels Are Not Associated with the Extent of Coronary Artery Disease or with Coronary Plaque Morphology.

Erbel C, Korosoglou G, Ler P, Akhavanpoor M, Domschke G, Linden F, Doesch AO, Buss SJ, Giannitsis E, Katus HA, Gleissner CA - PLoS ONE (2015)

CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with or without CAD.CXCL4 plasma levels as measured by ELISA in 217 individuals undergoing coronary computed-tomography angiography (CCTA) divided by „no CAD”(n = 107) and „CAD”(n = 110). For each group, box whisker plots and dot plots are shown.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629911&req=5

pone.0141693.g001: CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with or without CAD.CXCL4 plasma levels as measured by ELISA in 217 individuals undergoing coronary computed-tomography angiography (CCTA) divided by „no CAD”(n = 107) and „CAD”(n = 110). For each group, box whisker plots and dot plots are shown.
Mentions: CXCL4 plasma levels did not differ between patients with or without coronary artery disease (CAD: 12.5 ± 4.5 ng/ml, no CAD: 12.5 ± 4.8 ng/ml; Fig 1). In addition, when looking at specific features such as plaque volume, total calcium score, degree of stenosis, or vascular remodeling, no association was seen with CXCL4 levels (Table 2).

Bottom Line: We hypothesized that increased CXCL4 plasma levels may be associated with features of plaque instability resulting in adverse cardiovascular events.There was no significant correlation between CXCL4 levels and any clinical or demographic parameters including cardiovascular risk factors.Subgroup analysis of patients with CAD as confirmed by CCTA did not show any association of CXCL4 levels with the extent of CAD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, University Hospital, Im Neuenheimer Feld 410, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany; DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research), partner site Heidelberg, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Background: CXCL4 is a platelet chemokine released at micromolar concentrations upon platelet activation. CXCL4 has been shown to promote atherogenesis by various mechanisms. However, data on CXCL4 plasma levels in patients with coronary artery disease are largely inconclusive. Computed coronary artery angiography (CCTA) represents an excellent tool to quantify and characterize coronary atherosclerotic plaques. We hypothesized that increased CXCL4 plasma levels may be associated with features of plaque instability resulting in adverse cardiovascular events. Specifically, we sought to determine whether CXCL4 levels are correlated with specific features of coronary artery disease including (1) plaque volume, (2) calcium score, (3) degree of stenosis, or (4) vascular remodeling.

Methods and results: CXCL4 plasma levels were measured by ELISA in 217 patients undergoing CCTA for suspected CAD (mean age 64.2 ± 9.4 years, 107 (49.3%) male). Mean CXCL4 plasma levels were 12.5 ± 4.6 ng/mL. There was no significant correlation between CXCL4 levels and any clinical or demographic parameters including cardiovascular risk factors. CXCL4 plasma levels did not differ between patient with or without coronary artery disease (CAD: 12.5 ± 4.5 ng/ml, no CAD: 12.5 ± 4.8 ng/ml). Neither univariate nor multivariate analysis showed an association between CXCL4 levels and plaque volume, total calcium score, degree of stenosis, or vascular remodeling. Subgroup analysis of patients with CAD as confirmed by CCTA did not show any association of CXCL4 levels with the extent of CAD.

Conclusions: While CXCL4 may be present and active within the arterial wall, local increase of CXCL4 may not translate into systemically elevated CXCL4 levels. Further studies will have to test whether CXCL4 may still represent a suitable therapeutic target in human atherosclerosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus