Limits...
Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation.

Ferrer A, Sebastián R, Sánchez-Quintana D, Rodríguez JF, Godoy EJ, Martínez L, Saiz J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors.However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood.Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Bioingeniería (Ci2B), Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Atrial local activation times (LATs).a) Isochronal LAT maps produced by the atria with fibre orientation (anisotropic); b) LAT differences between atrial model with anisotropic and isotropic tissue conductivity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629897&req=5

pone.0141573.g006: Atrial local activation times (LATs).a) Isochronal LAT maps produced by the atria with fibre orientation (anisotropic); b) LAT differences between atrial model with anisotropic and isotropic tissue conductivity.

Mentions: Fig 6a shows the isochronal map of the atria activation sequence for the last stimulus applied (the tenth). After the SAN is depolarized (t = 0 ms, dark blue regions in Fig 6a), the CT, the BBR, the IB and the SCV simultaneously start their respective depolarisations (light blue regions in Fig 6a). The activation descends rapidly through the CT towards the ICV for 57 ms (arrow 1) activating sequentially the PMs and the endocardial wall of the IB. This activation pattern produces a triangular wavefront that spreads from CT to TV through the RLW and the RAA for 85 ms (arrow 2). The right side of the atrial septum (RAS) is activated by the IB at t = 20 ms, (light blue regions in Fig 6a), which allows a second wavefront to spread with lower conduction velocity from CT towards TV (arrow 3). Both wavefronts (arrows 2 and 3) collide in the TV, the last RA region activated, and thus produce the last activation time registered in the RA at t = 109 ms (orange regions in Fig 6a).


Detailed Anatomical and Electrophysiological Models of Human Atria and Torso for the Simulation of Atrial Activation.

Ferrer A, Sebastián R, Sánchez-Quintana D, Rodríguez JF, Godoy EJ, Martínez L, Saiz J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Atrial local activation times (LATs).a) Isochronal LAT maps produced by the atria with fibre orientation (anisotropic); b) LAT differences between atrial model with anisotropic and isotropic tissue conductivity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629897&req=5

pone.0141573.g006: Atrial local activation times (LATs).a) Isochronal LAT maps produced by the atria with fibre orientation (anisotropic); b) LAT differences between atrial model with anisotropic and isotropic tissue conductivity.
Mentions: Fig 6a shows the isochronal map of the atria activation sequence for the last stimulus applied (the tenth). After the SAN is depolarized (t = 0 ms, dark blue regions in Fig 6a), the CT, the BBR, the IB and the SCV simultaneously start their respective depolarisations (light blue regions in Fig 6a). The activation descends rapidly through the CT towards the ICV for 57 ms (arrow 1) activating sequentially the PMs and the endocardial wall of the IB. This activation pattern produces a triangular wavefront that spreads from CT to TV through the RLW and the RAA for 85 ms (arrow 2). The right side of the atrial septum (RAS) is activated by the IB at t = 20 ms, (light blue regions in Fig 6a), which allows a second wavefront to spread with lower conduction velocity from CT towards TV (arrow 3). Both wavefronts (arrows 2 and 3) collide in the TV, the last RA region activated, and thus produce the last activation time registered in the RA at t = 109 ms (orange regions in Fig 6a).

Bottom Line: In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors.However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood.Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigación e Innovación en Bioingeniería (Ci2B), Universitat Politècnica de València, Valencia, Spain.

ABSTRACT
Atrial arrhythmias, and specifically atrial fibrillation (AF), induce rapid and irregular activation patterns that appear on the torso surface as abnormal P-waves in electrocardiograms and body surface potential maps (BSPM). In recent years both P-waves and the BSPM have been used to identify the mechanisms underlying AF, such as localizing ectopic foci or high-frequency rotors. However, the relationship between the activation of the different areas of the atria and the characteristics of the BSPM and P-wave signals are still far from being completely understood. In this work we developed a multi-scale framework, which combines a highly-detailed 3D atrial model and a torso model to study the relationship between atrial activation and surface signals in sinus rhythm. Using this multi scale model, it was revealed that the best places for recording P-waves are the frontal upper right and the frontal and rear left quadrants of the torso. Our results also suggest that only nine regions (of the twenty-one structures in which the atrial surface was divided) make a significant contribution to the BSPM and determine the main P-wave characteristics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus