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Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders.

Barnig C, Alsaleh G, Jung N, Dembélé D, Paul N, Poirot A, Uring-Lambert B, Georgel P, de Blay F, Bahram S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease.We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis.Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM UMR S_1109, ImmunoRhumatologie Moléculaire, Labex Transplantex, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, 67085, Strasbourg Cedex, France; Service de Pneumologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France; Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire, OMICARE, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, 67085, Strasbourg, France.

ABSTRACT
Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach-in a limited number of patients and controls-to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Circulating eosinophils in asthma differ in their gene expression profile when compared to healthy subjects.Heat map of hierarchical clustering of the top expressed genes of circulating eosinophils from subjects with asthma (n = 4) vs healthy controls (n = 3). The horizontal dendrogram represents the relationship between asthmatic and healthy subjects. The vertical dendrogram represents the relationship between the expression levels of each gene across all the samples. Over-expressed genes are shown in red and under-expressed genes are depicted in green.
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pone.0141740.g002: Circulating eosinophils in asthma differ in their gene expression profile when compared to healthy subjects.Heat map of hierarchical clustering of the top expressed genes of circulating eosinophils from subjects with asthma (n = 4) vs healthy controls (n = 3). The horizontal dendrogram represents the relationship between asthmatic and healthy subjects. The vertical dendrogram represents the relationship between the expression levels of each gene across all the samples. Over-expressed genes are shown in red and under-expressed genes are depicted in green.

Mentions: For patient characteristics see Materials and Methods. Complete gene expression profiles from peripheral eosinophils were generated from asthmatic patients (n = 4) and non-atopic healthy controls (n = 3) upon RNA hybridization to Agilent microarrays measuring the expression levels of 27,958 Entrez Genes. Supervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the top over- and under- expressed genes (Fig 2) and unsupervised hierarchical clustering (S2 and S3 Figs) enabled us to discriminate asthmatic subjects from healthy controls. Statistical analysis [15] identified a total of 47 genes displaying a 2-fold or greater (21 up-regulated, 26 down-regulated) variation in eosinophils of asthmatic subjects when compared to healthy controls.


Circulating Human Eosinophils Share a Similar Transcriptional Profile in Asthma and Other Hypereosinophilic Disorders.

Barnig C, Alsaleh G, Jung N, Dembélé D, Paul N, Poirot A, Uring-Lambert B, Georgel P, de Blay F, Bahram S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Circulating eosinophils in asthma differ in their gene expression profile when compared to healthy subjects.Heat map of hierarchical clustering of the top expressed genes of circulating eosinophils from subjects with asthma (n = 4) vs healthy controls (n = 3). The horizontal dendrogram represents the relationship between asthmatic and healthy subjects. The vertical dendrogram represents the relationship between the expression levels of each gene across all the samples. Over-expressed genes are shown in red and under-expressed genes are depicted in green.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629890&req=5

pone.0141740.g002: Circulating eosinophils in asthma differ in their gene expression profile when compared to healthy subjects.Heat map of hierarchical clustering of the top expressed genes of circulating eosinophils from subjects with asthma (n = 4) vs healthy controls (n = 3). The horizontal dendrogram represents the relationship between asthmatic and healthy subjects. The vertical dendrogram represents the relationship between the expression levels of each gene across all the samples. Over-expressed genes are shown in red and under-expressed genes are depicted in green.
Mentions: For patient characteristics see Materials and Methods. Complete gene expression profiles from peripheral eosinophils were generated from asthmatic patients (n = 4) and non-atopic healthy controls (n = 3) upon RNA hybridization to Agilent microarrays measuring the expression levels of 27,958 Entrez Genes. Supervised hierarchical clustering analysis of the top over- and under- expressed genes (Fig 2) and unsupervised hierarchical clustering (S2 and S3 Figs) enabled us to discriminate asthmatic subjects from healthy controls. Statistical analysis [15] identified a total of 47 genes displaying a 2-fold or greater (21 up-regulated, 26 down-regulated) variation in eosinophils of asthmatic subjects when compared to healthy controls.

Bottom Line: Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease.We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis.Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: INSERM UMR S_1109, ImmunoRhumatologie Moléculaire, Labex Transplantex, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, 67085, Strasbourg Cedex, France; Service de Pneumologie, Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Nouvel Hôpital Civil, 67091, Strasbourg Cedex, France; Fédération Hospitalo-Universitaire, OMICARE, Centre de Recherche d'Immunologie et d'Hématologie, 67085, Strasbourg, France.

ABSTRACT
Eosinophils are leukocytes that are released into the peripheral blood in a phenotypically mature state and are capable of being recruited into tissues in response to appropriate stimuli. Eosinophils, traditionally considered cytotoxic effector cells, are leukocytes recruited into the airways of asthma patients where they are believed to contribute to the development of many features of the disease. This perception, however, has been challenged by recent findings suggesting that eosinophils have also immunomodulatory functions and may be involved in tissue homeostasis and wound healing. Here we describe a transcriptome-based approach-in a limited number of patients and controls-to investigate the activation state of circulating human eosinophils isolated by flow cytometry. We provide an overview of the global expression pattern in eosinophils in various relevant conditions, e.g., eosinophilic asthma, hypereosinophilic dermatological diseases, parasitosis and pulmonary aspergillosis. Compared to healthy subjects, circulating eosinophils isolated from asthma patients differed in their gene expression profile which is marked by downregulation of transcripts involved in antigen presentation, pathogen recognition and mucosal innate immunity, whereas up-regulated genes were involved in response to non-specific stimulation, wounding and maintenance of homeostasis. Eosinophils from other hypereosinophilic disorders displayed a very similar transcriptional profile. Taken together, these observations seem to indicate that eosinophils exhibit non-specific immunomodulatory functions important for tissue repair and homeostasis and suggest new roles for these cells in asthma immunobiology.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus