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Ambient Temperature and Prevalence of Obesity: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Korea.

Yang HK, Han K, Cho JH, Yoon KH, Cha BY, Lee SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Similarly, subjects in the area of the lowest quintile of DMT0 had significantly higher odds of abdominal obesity compared with the higher four quintile groups of DMT0.This study finds an association between ambient temperature and prevalence of obesity in the Korean population when controlling for several confounding factors.Adaptive thermogenesis might be a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have suggested a possible association between outdoor or indoor temperature and obesity. We aimed to examine whether ambient temperature is associated with the prevalence of obesity or abdominal obesity in the Korean population.

Methods: Data on anthropometric, socio-demographic, laboratory and lifestyle factors were retrieved from National Health Insurance System data obtained in 2009-2010. Thirty years (1981 to 2010) of meteorological parameters for 71 observation areas were acquired from the Korea Meteorological Administration. Included in this analysis were 124,354 individuals. A body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 and a waist circumference (WC) ≥ 90 cm (men) or 85 cm (women) were considered to represent obesity and abdominal obesity, respectively.

Results: The mean annual temperature (MAT) ranged from 6.6°C to 16.6°C, and BMI was positively correlated with MAT (r = 0.0078, P = 0.0065). WC was positively correlated with MAT (r = 0.0165, P < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with the number of days with mean temperature < 0°C (DMT0; r = -0.0129, P = 0.0002). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, exercise, income, residential area and altitude, the odds ratios (95% CI) for obesity and abdominal obesity in the highest quintile MAT group were 1.045 (1.010, 1.081) and 1.082 (1.042, 1.124), respectively, compared with the lower four quintiles of the MAT group. Similarly, subjects in the area of the lowest quintile of DMT0 had significantly higher odds of abdominal obesity compared with the higher four quintile groups of DMT0.

Conclusion: This study finds an association between ambient temperature and prevalence of obesity in the Korean population when controlling for several confounding factors. Adaptive thermogenesis might be a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between body mass index (A) and waist circumference (B) with mean annual temperature (MAT) based on 71 observation areas.Red dot: areas with more than 5,000 subjects; blue dot: areas with 1,000–5,000 subjects; black dot: areas with less than 1,000 subjects.
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pone.0141724.g002: Correlation between body mass index (A) and waist circumference (B) with mean annual temperature (MAT) based on 71 observation areas.Red dot: areas with more than 5,000 subjects; blue dot: areas with 1,000–5,000 subjects; black dot: areas with less than 1,000 subjects.

Mentions: Next, the values of the MAT and DMT0 for each of the 71 observation areas were plotted against their mean BMI and waist circumference values. After accounting for sampling weights of each area, both the BMI and waist circumference positively correlated with MAT and exhibited correlation coefficients of 0.141 (P < 0.0001) and 0.275 (P < 0.0001), respectively (Fig 2). BMI (r = –0.127, P < 0.0001) and waist circumference (r = –0.257, P < 0.0001) were negatively correlated with DMT0 (Fig 3).


Ambient Temperature and Prevalence of Obesity: A Nationwide Population-Based Study in Korea.

Yang HK, Han K, Cho JH, Yoon KH, Cha BY, Lee SH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Correlation between body mass index (A) and waist circumference (B) with mean annual temperature (MAT) based on 71 observation areas.Red dot: areas with more than 5,000 subjects; blue dot: areas with 1,000–5,000 subjects; black dot: areas with less than 1,000 subjects.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629885&req=5

pone.0141724.g002: Correlation between body mass index (A) and waist circumference (B) with mean annual temperature (MAT) based on 71 observation areas.Red dot: areas with more than 5,000 subjects; blue dot: areas with 1,000–5,000 subjects; black dot: areas with less than 1,000 subjects.
Mentions: Next, the values of the MAT and DMT0 for each of the 71 observation areas were plotted against their mean BMI and waist circumference values. After accounting for sampling weights of each area, both the BMI and waist circumference positively correlated with MAT and exhibited correlation coefficients of 0.141 (P < 0.0001) and 0.275 (P < 0.0001), respectively (Fig 2). BMI (r = –0.127, P < 0.0001) and waist circumference (r = –0.257, P < 0.0001) were negatively correlated with DMT0 (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Similarly, subjects in the area of the lowest quintile of DMT0 had significantly higher odds of abdominal obesity compared with the higher four quintile groups of DMT0.This study finds an association between ambient temperature and prevalence of obesity in the Korean population when controlling for several confounding factors.Adaptive thermogenesis might be a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent studies have suggested a possible association between outdoor or indoor temperature and obesity. We aimed to examine whether ambient temperature is associated with the prevalence of obesity or abdominal obesity in the Korean population.

Methods: Data on anthropometric, socio-demographic, laboratory and lifestyle factors were retrieved from National Health Insurance System data obtained in 2009-2010. Thirty years (1981 to 2010) of meteorological parameters for 71 observation areas were acquired from the Korea Meteorological Administration. Included in this analysis were 124,354 individuals. A body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 and a waist circumference (WC) ≥ 90 cm (men) or 85 cm (women) were considered to represent obesity and abdominal obesity, respectively.

Results: The mean annual temperature (MAT) ranged from 6.6°C to 16.6°C, and BMI was positively correlated with MAT (r = 0.0078, P = 0.0065). WC was positively correlated with MAT (r = 0.0165, P < 0.0001) and negatively correlated with the number of days with mean temperature < 0°C (DMT0; r = -0.0129, P = 0.0002). After adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, alcohol consumption, exercise, income, residential area and altitude, the odds ratios (95% CI) for obesity and abdominal obesity in the highest quintile MAT group were 1.045 (1.010, 1.081) and 1.082 (1.042, 1.124), respectively, compared with the lower four quintiles of the MAT group. Similarly, subjects in the area of the lowest quintile of DMT0 had significantly higher odds of abdominal obesity compared with the higher four quintile groups of DMT0.

Conclusion: This study finds an association between ambient temperature and prevalence of obesity in the Korean population when controlling for several confounding factors. Adaptive thermogenesis might be a possible explanation for this phenomenon.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus