Limits...
Pyrosequencing of Plaque Microflora In Twin Children with Discordant Caries Phenotypes.

Zhang M, Chen Y, Xie L, Li Y, Jiang H, Du M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire.A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05).Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOST KLOS & KLOBM, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Luoyu Road 237, Wuhan City, Hubei, China.

ABSTRACT
Despite recent successes in the control of dental caries, the mechanism of caries development remains unclear. To investigate the causes of dental decay, especially in early childhood caries, the supragingival microflora composition of 20 twins with discordant caries phenotypes were analyzed using high-throughput pyrosequencing. In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar. Although the genetic and environmental factors that strongly influence the microbial composition of dental caries remains unknown, we speculate that genetic factors primarily influence the individual's susceptibility to dental caries and that environmental factors primarily regulate the microbial composition of the dental plaque and the progression to caries. By using improved twins models and increased sample sizes, our study can be extended to analyze the specific genetic and environmental factors that affect the development of caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The barplot graph of samples microorganisms and the predominant bacteria of three groups.(A, B, C) Abundance and prevalence of bacteria at the phylum, genus, and species level in the 30 plaque samples. (a, b, c) Mean levels of the predominant bacteria in groups H1, H2 and C2 at the phylum, genus, and species level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629883&req=5

pone.0141310.g002: The barplot graph of samples microorganisms and the predominant bacteria of three groups.(A, B, C) Abundance and prevalence of bacteria at the phylum, genus, and species level in the 30 plaque samples. (a, b, c) Mean levels of the predominant bacteria in groups H1, H2 and C2 at the phylum, genus, and species level.

Mentions: In a BLAST search against the HOMD, a total of 10 phyla, 20 classes, 33 orders, 55 families, 84 genera, and 155 species were detected. The proportions of the predominant taxa at the phylum, genus, and species levels were compared among the groups (Fig 2). The classification of sequences by phylum is summarized in Fig 2A. The vast majority of sequences belonged to these five phyla: Proteobacteria (29.8%), Bacteroidetes (19.5%), Firmicutes (19.5%), Fusobacteria (16.5%), and Actinobacteria (14.4%). In group C2, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found at relatively high abundance (P>0.05), whereas Fusobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found less frequently. Among the five common phyla, only Bacteroidetes had a significant difference between the caries-free plaques (H1 and H2 group) and caries-active plaques (C2 group) (P = 0.0370 and P = 0.0220, respectively). The TM7 phylum was found only in groups H1 and H2, the DSR1 phylum was found only in group H2, and the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum was found only in group C2.


Pyrosequencing of Plaque Microflora In Twin Children with Discordant Caries Phenotypes.

Zhang M, Chen Y, Xie L, Li Y, Jiang H, Du M - PLoS ONE (2015)

The barplot graph of samples microorganisms and the predominant bacteria of three groups.(A, B, C) Abundance and prevalence of bacteria at the phylum, genus, and species level in the 30 plaque samples. (a, b, c) Mean levels of the predominant bacteria in groups H1, H2 and C2 at the phylum, genus, and species level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629883&req=5

pone.0141310.g002: The barplot graph of samples microorganisms and the predominant bacteria of three groups.(A, B, C) Abundance and prevalence of bacteria at the phylum, genus, and species level in the 30 plaque samples. (a, b, c) Mean levels of the predominant bacteria in groups H1, H2 and C2 at the phylum, genus, and species level.
Mentions: In a BLAST search against the HOMD, a total of 10 phyla, 20 classes, 33 orders, 55 families, 84 genera, and 155 species were detected. The proportions of the predominant taxa at the phylum, genus, and species levels were compared among the groups (Fig 2). The classification of sequences by phylum is summarized in Fig 2A. The vast majority of sequences belonged to these five phyla: Proteobacteria (29.8%), Bacteroidetes (19.5%), Firmicutes (19.5%), Fusobacteria (16.5%), and Actinobacteria (14.4%). In group C2, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria were found at relatively high abundance (P>0.05), whereas Fusobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found less frequently. Among the five common phyla, only Bacteroidetes had a significant difference between the caries-free plaques (H1 and H2 group) and caries-active plaques (C2 group) (P = 0.0370 and P = 0.0220, respectively). The TM7 phylum was found only in groups H1 and H2, the DSR1 phylum was found only in group H2, and the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum was found only in group C2.

Bottom Line: In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire.A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05).Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: MOST KLOS & KLOBM, School & Hospital of Stomatology, Wuhan University, Luoyu Road 237, Wuhan City, Hubei, China.

ABSTRACT
Despite recent successes in the control of dental caries, the mechanism of caries development remains unclear. To investigate the causes of dental decay, especially in early childhood caries, the supragingival microflora composition of 20 twins with discordant caries phenotypes were analyzed using high-throughput pyrosequencing. In addition, the parents completed a lifestyle questionnaire. A total of 228,789 sequencing reads revealed 10 phyla, 84 genera, and 155 species of microflora, the relative abundances of these strains varied dramatically among the children, Comparative analysis between groups revealed that Veillonella, Corynebacterium and Actinomyces were presumed to be caries-related genera, Fusobacterium, Kingella and Leptotrichia were presumed to be healthy-related genus, yet this six genera were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Moreover, a cluster analysis revealed that the microbial composition of samples in the same group was often dissimilar but that the microbial composition observed in twins was usually similar. Although the genetic and environmental factors that strongly influence the microbial composition of dental caries remains unknown, we speculate that genetic factors primarily influence the individual's susceptibility to dental caries and that environmental factors primarily regulate the microbial composition of the dental plaque and the progression to caries. By using improved twins models and increased sample sizes, our study can be extended to analyze the specific genetic and environmental factors that affect the development of caries.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus