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Improved asthma control in patients with severe, persistent allergic asthma after 12 months of nightly temperature-controlled laminar airflow: an observational study with retrospective comparisons.

Schauer U, Bergmann KC, Gerstlauer M, Lehmann S, Gappa M, Brenneken A, Schulz C, Ahrens P, Schreiber J, Wittmann M, Hamelmann E, all members of the German Asthma Net (GA - Eur Clin Respir J (2015)

Bottom Line: It has been shown that temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) significantly reduced allergen exposure and airway inflammation and improved quality of life of patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma.The objective was to evaluate the effects of nighttime TLA when used during real-life conditions for 12 consecutive months in addition to the patients' regular medication.The mean number of exacerbations was reduced from 3.6 to 1.3 (p<0.0001), and the ratio of asthma-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations diminished from 72.4 to 23.3% (p=0.001) or from 44.8 to 20.0% (p<0.05), respectively, after 12 months of TLA use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy-Center-Ruhr, University Children's Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Continuous or episodic allergen exposure is a major risk factor of frequent symptoms and exacerbations for patients with allergic asthma. It has been shown that temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) significantly reduced allergen exposure and airway inflammation and improved quality of life of patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effects of nighttime TLA when used during real-life conditions for 12 consecutive months in addition to the patients' regular medication.

Methods: This multicenter, pre- and postretrospective observational study included patients with inadequately controlled moderate-to-severe allergic asthma who received add-on treatment with TLA for 12 consecutive months. Data on medication use, asthma control, asthma symptoms, lung function, use of hospital resources, and exacerbations were collected after 4 and 12 months and compared with corresponding data collected retrospectively from medical records during the year prior to inclusion in the study.

Results: Data from 30 patients (mean age 28; range 8-70) completing 4 months and 27 patients completing 12 months of TLA use are presented. The mean number of exacerbations was reduced from 3.6 to 1.3 (p<0.0001), and the ratio of asthma-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations diminished from 72.4 to 23.3% (p=0.001) or from 44.8 to 20.0% (p<0.05), respectively, after 12 months of TLA use. The Asthma Control Test index increased from 14.1 to 18.5 (p<0.0001). After 4 months of TLA use, clear improvements can be shown for most variables in line with the data collected after 12 months.

Conclusions: The addition of TLA to the patients' regular medication significantly reduced exacerbations, asthma symptoms, and the utilization of hospital resources. The data support that TLA may be an important new non-pharmacological approach in the management of poorly controlled allergic asthma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Classification of the asthma control of patients studied according to GINA (24) at baseline and after 4 and 12 months of TLA use.
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Figure 0002: Classification of the asthma control of patients studied according to GINA (24) at baseline and after 4 and 12 months of TLA use.

Mentions: After 12 months of TLA use, the proportion of patients with uncontrolled disease had diminished from 55 to 0%, and the ratio with controlled disease increased from 10 to 34%. The outcome after 4 months approached statistical significance (p=0.0503) but was highly significant (p<0.001) after 12 months TLA use (Fig. 2).


Improved asthma control in patients with severe, persistent allergic asthma after 12 months of nightly temperature-controlled laminar airflow: an observational study with retrospective comparisons.

Schauer U, Bergmann KC, Gerstlauer M, Lehmann S, Gappa M, Brenneken A, Schulz C, Ahrens P, Schreiber J, Wittmann M, Hamelmann E, all members of the German Asthma Net (GA - Eur Clin Respir J (2015)

Classification of the asthma control of patients studied according to GINA (24) at baseline and after 4 and 12 months of TLA use.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4629753&req=5

Figure 0002: Classification of the asthma control of patients studied according to GINA (24) at baseline and after 4 and 12 months of TLA use.
Mentions: After 12 months of TLA use, the proportion of patients with uncontrolled disease had diminished from 55 to 0%, and the ratio with controlled disease increased from 10 to 34%. The outcome after 4 months approached statistical significance (p=0.0503) but was highly significant (p<0.001) after 12 months TLA use (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: It has been shown that temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) significantly reduced allergen exposure and airway inflammation and improved quality of life of patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma.The objective was to evaluate the effects of nighttime TLA when used during real-life conditions for 12 consecutive months in addition to the patients' regular medication.The mean number of exacerbations was reduced from 3.6 to 1.3 (p<0.0001), and the ratio of asthma-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations diminished from 72.4 to 23.3% (p=0.001) or from 44.8 to 20.0% (p<0.05), respectively, after 12 months of TLA use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Allergy-Center-Ruhr, University Children's Hospital, Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Continuous or episodic allergen exposure is a major risk factor of frequent symptoms and exacerbations for patients with allergic asthma. It has been shown that temperature-controlled laminar airflow (TLA) significantly reduced allergen exposure and airway inflammation and improved quality of life of patients with poorly controlled allergic asthma.

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the effects of nighttime TLA when used during real-life conditions for 12 consecutive months in addition to the patients' regular medication.

Methods: This multicenter, pre- and postretrospective observational study included patients with inadequately controlled moderate-to-severe allergic asthma who received add-on treatment with TLA for 12 consecutive months. Data on medication use, asthma control, asthma symptoms, lung function, use of hospital resources, and exacerbations were collected after 4 and 12 months and compared with corresponding data collected retrospectively from medical records during the year prior to inclusion in the study.

Results: Data from 30 patients (mean age 28; range 8-70) completing 4 months and 27 patients completing 12 months of TLA use are presented. The mean number of exacerbations was reduced from 3.6 to 1.3 (p<0.0001), and the ratio of asthma-related emergency room visits or hospitalizations diminished from 72.4 to 23.3% (p=0.001) or from 44.8 to 20.0% (p<0.05), respectively, after 12 months of TLA use. The Asthma Control Test index increased from 14.1 to 18.5 (p<0.0001). After 4 months of TLA use, clear improvements can be shown for most variables in line with the data collected after 12 months.

Conclusions: The addition of TLA to the patients' regular medication significantly reduced exacerbations, asthma symptoms, and the utilization of hospital resources. The data support that TLA may be an important new non-pharmacological approach in the management of poorly controlled allergic asthma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus