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Five willow varieties cultivated across diverse field environments reveal stem density variation associated with high tension wood abundance

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Sustainable and inexpensive production of biomass is necessary to make biofuel production feasible, but represents a challenge. Five short rotation coppice willow cultivars, selected for high biomass yield, were cultivated on sites at four diverse regions of Quebec in contrasting environments. Wood composition and anatomical traits were characterized. Tree height and stem diameter were measured to evaluate growth performance of the cultivars according to the diverse pedoclimatic conditions. Each cultivar showed very specific responses to its environment. While no significant variation in lignin content was observed between sites, there was variation between cultivars. Surprisingly, the pattern of substantial genotype variability in stem density was maintained across all sites. However, wood anatomy did differ between sites in a cultivar (producing high and low density wood), suggesting a probable response to an abiotic stress. Furthermore, twice as many cellulose-rich G-fibers, comprising over 50% of secondary xylem, were also found in the high density wood, a finding with potential to bring higher value to the lignocellulosic bioethanol industry.

No MeSH data available.


Five willow cultivars in their second year of a harvest cycle (Salix viminalis 5027, S. dasyclados SV1, S. miyabeana SX61, S. miyabeana SX64, S. miyabeana SX67) sampled at four field trials in Québec: Saint-Roch-de-l′Achigan, Beloeil, S-S and LP.(A) Variation in extractives (toluene-ethanol/water extraction); (B) lignin content expressed as a percentage of dry matter and (C) total polyphenolics content (methanol-extractable). Error bars represent standard error, n = 4 blocks (four trees per block). Tukey’s HSD pairwise post hoc test (α = 0.05) are represented by letters a–b.
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Figure 3: Five willow cultivars in their second year of a harvest cycle (Salix viminalis 5027, S. dasyclados SV1, S. miyabeana SX61, S. miyabeana SX64, S. miyabeana SX67) sampled at four field trials in Québec: Saint-Roch-de-l′Achigan, Beloeil, S-S and LP.(A) Variation in extractives (toluene-ethanol/water extraction); (B) lignin content expressed as a percentage of dry matter and (C) total polyphenolics content (methanol-extractable). Error bars represent standard error, n = 4 blocks (four trees per block). Tukey’s HSD pairwise post hoc test (α = 0.05) are represented by letters a–b.

Mentions: Wood extractives content varied significantly (p < 0.05, ANOVA F-test) between genotypes and sites. Extractives were higher in all trees cultivated at SS (14.5% SE 0.5) and SR (13.1% SE 0.1) (Figure 3A), almost double that of B and LP, which had 7.1 and 8.7% extractives, respectively. Within extractable compounds, substantially more polyphenols were produced from a single site (SR) than any other, and by a single genotype (SX67), with 4.28 mg (total for the five cultivars at SR) and 7.39 mg (SX67 average at SR) g-1 gallic acid equivalent, respectively, (Figure 3C). Significant differences in total lignin content were not observed between or within the sites (Figure 3B).


Five willow varieties cultivated across diverse field environments reveal stem density variation associated with high tension wood abundance
Five willow cultivars in their second year of a harvest cycle (Salix viminalis 5027, S. dasyclados SV1, S. miyabeana SX61, S. miyabeana SX64, S. miyabeana SX67) sampled at four field trials in Québec: Saint-Roch-de-l′Achigan, Beloeil, S-S and LP.(A) Variation in extractives (toluene-ethanol/water extraction); (B) lignin content expressed as a percentage of dry matter and (C) total polyphenolics content (methanol-extractable). Error bars represent standard error, n = 4 blocks (four trees per block). Tukey’s HSD pairwise post hoc test (α = 0.05) are represented by letters a–b.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Figure 3: Five willow cultivars in their second year of a harvest cycle (Salix viminalis 5027, S. dasyclados SV1, S. miyabeana SX61, S. miyabeana SX64, S. miyabeana SX67) sampled at four field trials in Québec: Saint-Roch-de-l′Achigan, Beloeil, S-S and LP.(A) Variation in extractives (toluene-ethanol/water extraction); (B) lignin content expressed as a percentage of dry matter and (C) total polyphenolics content (methanol-extractable). Error bars represent standard error, n = 4 blocks (four trees per block). Tukey’s HSD pairwise post hoc test (α = 0.05) are represented by letters a–b.
Mentions: Wood extractives content varied significantly (p < 0.05, ANOVA F-test) between genotypes and sites. Extractives were higher in all trees cultivated at SS (14.5% SE 0.5) and SR (13.1% SE 0.1) (Figure 3A), almost double that of B and LP, which had 7.1 and 8.7% extractives, respectively. Within extractable compounds, substantially more polyphenols were produced from a single site (SR) than any other, and by a single genotype (SX67), with 4.28 mg (total for the five cultivars at SR) and 7.39 mg (SX67 average at SR) g-1 gallic acid equivalent, respectively, (Figure 3C). Significant differences in total lignin content were not observed between or within the sites (Figure 3B).

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

Sustainable and inexpensive production of biomass is necessary to make biofuel production feasible, but represents a challenge. Five short rotation coppice willow cultivars, selected for high biomass yield, were cultivated on sites at four diverse regions of Quebec in contrasting environments. Wood composition and anatomical traits were characterized. Tree height and stem diameter were measured to evaluate growth performance of the cultivars according to the diverse pedoclimatic conditions. Each cultivar showed very specific responses to its environment. While no significant variation in lignin content was observed between sites, there was variation between cultivars. Surprisingly, the pattern of substantial genotype variability in stem density was maintained across all sites. However, wood anatomy did differ between sites in a cultivar (producing high and low density wood), suggesting a probable response to an abiotic stress. Furthermore, twice as many cellulose-rich G-fibers, comprising over 50% of secondary xylem, were also found in the high density wood, a finding with potential to bring higher value to the lignocellulosic bioethanol industry.

No MeSH data available.