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Metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for terpenoid production.

Guan Z, Xue D, Abdallah II, Dijkshoorn L, Setroikromo R, Lv G, Quax WJ - Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2015)

Bottom Line: On the other hand, our literature survey (20 years) revealed that terpenoids are naturally more widespread in Bacillales.In the mid-1990s, an inherent methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway was discovered in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis).We will summarize some major advances and outline future directions for exploiting the potential of B. subtilis as a desired "cell factory" to produce terpenoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, Building 3215, room 917, 9713 AV, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Terpenoids are the largest group of small-molecule natural products, with more than 60,000 compounds made from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). As the most diverse group of small-molecule natural products, terpenoids play an important role in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. For decades, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) were extensively studied to biosynthesize terpenoids, because they are both fully amenable to genetic modifications and have vast molecular resources. On the other hand, our literature survey (20 years) revealed that terpenoids are naturally more widespread in Bacillales. In the mid-1990s, an inherent methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway was discovered in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Since B. subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) organism and has long been used for the industrial production of proteins, attempts to biosynthesize terpenoids in this bacterium have aroused much interest in the scientific community. This review discusses metabolic engineering of B. subtilis for terpenoid production, and encountered challenges will be discussed. We will summarize some major advances and outline future directions for exploiting the potential of B. subtilis as a desired "cell factory" to produce terpenoids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles and terpenoid related gene reports, by source. a Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by source. b Publication amount of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by year. c Percent of terpenoid related gene reports, by source
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Fig1: Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles and terpenoid related gene reports, by source. a Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by source. b Publication amount of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by year. c Percent of terpenoid related gene reports, by source

Mentions: Along with a growing attraction for sustainable production, great interest has been expressed in biotechnological production of chemical products in general and terpenoids in particular. Since the 1990s, the interest in biosynthesizing terpenoids has skyrocketed, especially for desperately needed efficacious drugs such as artemisinin (Chang et al. 2007; Martin et al., 2003; Newman et al., 2006; Paddon et al. 2013; Ro et al. 2006; Tsuruta et al. 2009; Westfall et al. 2012) and taxol (Ajikumar et al. 2010; Jiang et al. 2012). In the past 20 years, most research has focused on using Escherichia coli, the host with the most advanced genetic tools, for biosynthesis of terpenoids (Fig. 1). Intensive experimentation in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has led to high yield production of some isoprenoids. However, uncertainty still looms around some aspects such as genetic engineering, characterization, reliability, quantitative strategy, and independence of biological modules (Kwok 2010). More options are needed to validate and optimize cell factories for terpenoid production. According to PubMed data, in comparison to other microorganisms, Bacillales (47.32 %) naturally possess more genes and proteins related to terpenoid biosynthesis pathways (Fig. 1), but surprisingly, little research effort has been devoted to the study of Bacillales as factories for natural products.Fig. 1


Metabolic engineering of Bacillus subtilis for terpenoid production.

Guan Z, Xue D, Abdallah II, Dijkshoorn L, Setroikromo R, Lv G, Quax WJ - Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. (2015)

Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles and terpenoid related gene reports, by source. a Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by source. b Publication amount of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by year. c Percent of terpenoid related gene reports, by source
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4628092&req=5

Fig1: Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles and terpenoid related gene reports, by source. a Percent of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by source. b Publication amount of terpenoid biosynthesis related articles, by year. c Percent of terpenoid related gene reports, by source
Mentions: Along with a growing attraction for sustainable production, great interest has been expressed in biotechnological production of chemical products in general and terpenoids in particular. Since the 1990s, the interest in biosynthesizing terpenoids has skyrocketed, especially for desperately needed efficacious drugs such as artemisinin (Chang et al. 2007; Martin et al., 2003; Newman et al., 2006; Paddon et al. 2013; Ro et al. 2006; Tsuruta et al. 2009; Westfall et al. 2012) and taxol (Ajikumar et al. 2010; Jiang et al. 2012). In the past 20 years, most research has focused on using Escherichia coli, the host with the most advanced genetic tools, for biosynthesis of terpenoids (Fig. 1). Intensive experimentation in Escherichia coli (E. coli) has led to high yield production of some isoprenoids. However, uncertainty still looms around some aspects such as genetic engineering, characterization, reliability, quantitative strategy, and independence of biological modules (Kwok 2010). More options are needed to validate and optimize cell factories for terpenoid production. According to PubMed data, in comparison to other microorganisms, Bacillales (47.32 %) naturally possess more genes and proteins related to terpenoid biosynthesis pathways (Fig. 1), but surprisingly, little research effort has been devoted to the study of Bacillales as factories for natural products.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: On the other hand, our literature survey (20 years) revealed that terpenoids are naturally more widespread in Bacillales.In the mid-1990s, an inherent methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway was discovered in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis).We will summarize some major advances and outline future directions for exploiting the potential of B. subtilis as a desired "cell factory" to produce terpenoids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Groningen Research Institute of Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, Building 3215, room 917, 9713 AV, Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
Terpenoids are the largest group of small-molecule natural products, with more than 60,000 compounds made from isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and its isomer dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). As the most diverse group of small-molecule natural products, terpenoids play an important role in the pharmaceutical, food, and cosmetic industries. For decades, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) were extensively studied to biosynthesize terpenoids, because they are both fully amenable to genetic modifications and have vast molecular resources. On the other hand, our literature survey (20 years) revealed that terpenoids are naturally more widespread in Bacillales. In the mid-1990s, an inherent methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway was discovered in Bacillus subtilis (B. subtilis). Since B. subtilis is a generally recognized as safe (GRAS) organism and has long been used for the industrial production of proteins, attempts to biosynthesize terpenoids in this bacterium have aroused much interest in the scientific community. This review discusses metabolic engineering of B. subtilis for terpenoid production, and encountered challenges will be discussed. We will summarize some major advances and outline future directions for exploiting the potential of B. subtilis as a desired "cell factory" to produce terpenoids.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus