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The growth rate of "clinically significant" renal cancer.

Gofrit ON, Yutkin V, Zorn KC, Duvdevani M, Landau EH, Hidas G, Pode D - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: According to the proposed model, the average growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45, range 0.2-6.5 cm/year).Tumor growth rate correlated inversely with patient's age (p = 0.007).Patient gender or Fuhrman's grade did not correlate however.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, POBox 12000, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Surveillance studies of enhancing renal masses report on a mean tumor growth rate of about 0.3 cm/year. In most of these studies however, only small tumors in elderly patients were followed. In the current report, we attempt to evaluate the growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas defined as tumors that were treated immediately upon diagnosis. 46 patients (mean age 64 years SD 11 years) were treated for renal carcinoma. All had a cross-sectional imaging studies performed 6-60 months prior to diagnosis of kidney cancer demonstrating no tumor. Tumor growth rate was calculated by dividing tumor's largest diameter by the time interval between the normal kidney imaging and diagnosis of renal cancer. Mean tumor diameter was 4.5 cm (SD 2.4 cm). Mean time period from the normal imaging to diagnosis of renal cancer was 33.6 months (SD 18 months). According to the proposed model, the average growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45, range 0.2-6.5 cm/year). Tumor growth rate correlated inversely with patient's age (p = 0.007). Patient gender or Fuhrman's grade did not correlate however. The growth rate of "clinically significant" renal cancer appears to be higher than the rate reported in surveillance trials. Renal tumors tend to grow faster in young patients. As such, variable growth rate should be taken into account when considering active surveillance in young patients and when designing trials for evaluation of anti-cancer agents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between patient’s age and tumor growth rate
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Fig2: Correlation between patient’s age and tumor growth rate

Mentions: Based on the model, the average growth rate of kidney tumors in the study was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45 cm/year, range 0.2–6.5 cm/year). The effect of various parameters on tumor growth rate is presented in Table 2. Figure 2 demonstrates that tumors’ growth rate correlates inversely with patient’s age (p = 0.007). Patient’s gender, type of previous imaging showing normal kidney, Fuhrman’s grade and metastases development during follow-up did not show significant correlation with growth rate.Table 2


The growth rate of "clinically significant" renal cancer.

Gofrit ON, Yutkin V, Zorn KC, Duvdevani M, Landau EH, Hidas G, Pode D - Springerplus (2015)

Correlation between patient’s age and tumor growth rate
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4628034&req=5

Fig2: Correlation between patient’s age and tumor growth rate
Mentions: Based on the model, the average growth rate of kidney tumors in the study was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45 cm/year, range 0.2–6.5 cm/year). The effect of various parameters on tumor growth rate is presented in Table 2. Figure 2 demonstrates that tumors’ growth rate correlates inversely with patient’s age (p = 0.007). Patient’s gender, type of previous imaging showing normal kidney, Fuhrman’s grade and metastases development during follow-up did not show significant correlation with growth rate.Table 2

Bottom Line: According to the proposed model, the average growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45, range 0.2-6.5 cm/year).Tumor growth rate correlated inversely with patient's age (p = 0.007).Patient gender or Fuhrman's grade did not correlate however.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, POBox 12000, 91120 Jerusalem, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Surveillance studies of enhancing renal masses report on a mean tumor growth rate of about 0.3 cm/year. In most of these studies however, only small tumors in elderly patients were followed. In the current report, we attempt to evaluate the growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas defined as tumors that were treated immediately upon diagnosis. 46 patients (mean age 64 years SD 11 years) were treated for renal carcinoma. All had a cross-sectional imaging studies performed 6-60 months prior to diagnosis of kidney cancer demonstrating no tumor. Tumor growth rate was calculated by dividing tumor's largest diameter by the time interval between the normal kidney imaging and diagnosis of renal cancer. Mean tumor diameter was 4.5 cm (SD 2.4 cm). Mean time period from the normal imaging to diagnosis of renal cancer was 33.6 months (SD 18 months). According to the proposed model, the average growth rate of "clinically significant" renal carcinomas was 2.13 cm/year (SD 1.45, range 0.2-6.5 cm/year). Tumor growth rate correlated inversely with patient's age (p = 0.007). Patient gender or Fuhrman's grade did not correlate however. The growth rate of "clinically significant" renal cancer appears to be higher than the rate reported in surveillance trials. Renal tumors tend to grow faster in young patients. As such, variable growth rate should be taken into account when considering active surveillance in young patients and when designing trials for evaluation of anti-cancer agents.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus