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A case of co-existing paraganglioma and thymoma.

Bano G, Sennik D, Kenchaiah M, Kyaw Y, Snape K, Tripathi V, Wilson P, Vlahos I, Hunt I, Hodgson S - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: After treatment her constitutional symptoms improved.The first case reported was bilateral carotid body tumour, thyroid gland adenoma and thymoma.This case also highlights the importance of long term surveillance, multidisciplinary management and being aware of associated pathologies in patients with isolated paraganglioma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Thomas Addison Unit, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London, SW17 0QT UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Head and neck paragangliomas are rare tumours and can arise as a part of inherited syndromes. Their association with thymic tumour is not well known.

Case description: This report describes a female patient who presented with right sided neck paragangliomas. The histology of the tumour was consistent with paraganlioma. Few years later her MRI scan of the chest revealed presence of an anterior mediastinal mass that corresponded to the location of the thymus. Review of her previous scans showed that the mass was present all along and had gradually increased in size. Patient developed symptoms including fatigue, dyspnoea, migratory polyarthritis, Raynaud's phenomenon and erythema nodosum. She had sternotomy and excision of mediastinal mass. The histology was consistent with cortical thymoma (WHO type B2) and she had radiotherapy. After treatment her constitutional symptoms improved. Her paraganglioma susceptibility genes are negative.

Discussion and evaluation: To our knowledge this is only the second case report in the literature of coexistence of carotid body tumour and thymoma. The first case reported was bilateral carotid body tumour, thyroid gland adenoma and thymoma. This case also highlights the importance of long term surveillance, multidisciplinary management and being aware of associated pathologies in patients with isolated paraganglioma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MiBG scan: no focal uptake in mediastinum
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Fig5: MiBG scan: no focal uptake in mediastinum

Mentions: Two years later her annual scan revealed an increase in the size of mediastinal mass to 5.8 by 3.1 cm (Fig. 4) Whole body metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed no uptake in the mass (Fig. 5). At this stage patient had noticed some additional symptoms including fatigue, hoarse voice and dyspnoea. She also described migratory polyarthritis of the small joints, Raynaud’s phenomenon and erythema nodosum. She was referred to the neurology team to exclude myasthenia gravis in view of her mediastinal mass. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative.Fig. 5


A case of co-existing paraganglioma and thymoma.

Bano G, Sennik D, Kenchaiah M, Kyaw Y, Snape K, Tripathi V, Wilson P, Vlahos I, Hunt I, Hodgson S - Springerplus (2015)

MiBG scan: no focal uptake in mediastinum
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4628025&req=5

Fig5: MiBG scan: no focal uptake in mediastinum
Mentions: Two years later her annual scan revealed an increase in the size of mediastinal mass to 5.8 by 3.1 cm (Fig. 4) Whole body metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed no uptake in the mass (Fig. 5). At this stage patient had noticed some additional symptoms including fatigue, hoarse voice and dyspnoea. She also described migratory polyarthritis of the small joints, Raynaud’s phenomenon and erythema nodosum. She was referred to the neurology team to exclude myasthenia gravis in view of her mediastinal mass. Acetylcholine receptor antibodies were negative.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: After treatment her constitutional symptoms improved.The first case reported was bilateral carotid body tumour, thyroid gland adenoma and thymoma.This case also highlights the importance of long term surveillance, multidisciplinary management and being aware of associated pathologies in patients with isolated paraganglioma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology and Diabetes, Thomas Addison Unit, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, Blackshaw Road, Tooting, London, SW17 0QT UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Head and neck paragangliomas are rare tumours and can arise as a part of inherited syndromes. Their association with thymic tumour is not well known.

Case description: This report describes a female patient who presented with right sided neck paragangliomas. The histology of the tumour was consistent with paraganlioma. Few years later her MRI scan of the chest revealed presence of an anterior mediastinal mass that corresponded to the location of the thymus. Review of her previous scans showed that the mass was present all along and had gradually increased in size. Patient developed symptoms including fatigue, dyspnoea, migratory polyarthritis, Raynaud's phenomenon and erythema nodosum. She had sternotomy and excision of mediastinal mass. The histology was consistent with cortical thymoma (WHO type B2) and she had radiotherapy. After treatment her constitutional symptoms improved. Her paraganglioma susceptibility genes are negative.

Discussion and evaluation: To our knowledge this is only the second case report in the literature of coexistence of carotid body tumour and thymoma. The first case reported was bilateral carotid body tumour, thyroid gland adenoma and thymoma. This case also highlights the importance of long term surveillance, multidisciplinary management and being aware of associated pathologies in patients with isolated paraganglioma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus