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Small-scale capture, transport and tank adaptation of live, medium-sized Scombrids using "Tuna Tubes".

Bar I, Dutney L, Lee P, Yazawa R, Yoshizaki G, Takeuchi Y, Cummins S, Elizur A - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, 19 fish were captured using rod and line and 42 % of the captured fish were transported alive in the custom-designed tuna tubes to an on-shore holding tank: five mackerel tuna (Euthynnus affinis) and three leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans).Out of these, just three (15.8 % of total fish) acclimatized to the tank's condition.Based on these results, we discuss an improved design of the tuna tubes that has the potential to increase survival rates and enable a simple and low cost method of transporting of live pelagic fish.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, Genecology Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, QLD 4558 Australia.

ABSTRACT
The transport of live fish is a crucial step to establish fish culture in captivity, and is especially challenging for species that have not been commonly cultured before, therefore transport and handling methods need to be optimized and tailored. This study describes the use of tuna tubes for small-scale transport of medium-sized pelagic fish from the Scombridae family. Tuna tubes are an array of vertical tubes that hold the fish, while fresh seawater is pumped up the tubes and through the fish mouth and gills, providing oxygen and removing wastes. In this study, 19 fish were captured using rod and line and 42 % of the captured fish were transported alive in the custom-designed tuna tubes to an on-shore holding tank: five mackerel tuna (Euthynnus affinis) and three leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans). Out of these, just three (15.8 % of total fish) acclimatized to the tank's condition. Based on these results, we discuss an improved design of the tuna tubes that has the potential to increase survival rates and enable a simple and low cost method of transporting of live pelagic fish.

No MeSH data available.


Map of fishing area around BIRC, at south-east Queensland, Australia. Markers on map show points of interest: a Bribie Island Research Centre (BIRC). b Spinnaker Sound Marina. White shaded area shows fishing grounds covered during trips. Centre of map at coordinates S27°05ʹ06ʺ, E153°16ʹ00ʺ; scale bar on map is equivalent to 5 km
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Fig5: Map of fishing area around BIRC, at south-east Queensland, Australia. Markers on map show points of interest: a Bribie Island Research Centre (BIRC). b Spinnaker Sound Marina. White shaded area shows fishing grounds covered during trips. Centre of map at coordinates S27°05ʹ06ʺ, E153°16ʹ00ʺ; scale bar on map is equivalent to 5 km

Mentions: Within 1 h of the capture of the first fish, the boat set ashore to a landing site as proximate as possible to the BIRC, to reduce to a minimum the time the fish were kept in the transport unit. When surf conditions allowed (i.e. swell height below 1 m), the boat approached the beach closest to the research centre (Woorim Beach on Bribie Island, Fig. 5a), located within a maximum of 1 h boat ride from the fishing grounds. A team member waited at the beach with a Recreational Off-highway Vehicle (ROV) and a fish transport trailer, with a 1000 L oxygenated seawater holding tank. The pumps were disconnected from the tubes, which were unloaded from the boat and quickly loaded on the ROV and then driven up to the trailer. The tubes were transferred to the tank on the transport trailer and the pumps were re-installed and connected to a battery to pump freshly oxygenated seawater over the fish. The trailer was then driven to BIRC, where the tubes were detached again from the pumps and manually transferred and submerged into the assigned 100 m3 broodstock tank to release the fish (Additional file 1: Video S1; Bar 2013). Overall, the transportation from the boat to the fish tank took less than 15 min, out of which the fish were in the tubes without active water circulation for a maximum of 2 min. When surf conditions did not allow for an open beach approach, the fish were transferred from the boat to the transport trailer at the Spinnaker Sound Marina, which added an additional 1.5 h to the total transport time until the fish were placed in the designated broodstock tank in BIRC. Fish that did not survive the transport to BIRC were dissected and examined to determine their sex and gonad developmental stage. Gonado-somatic index (GSI) was calculated as the percentage of gonad weight from the total body weight.Fig. 5


Small-scale capture, transport and tank adaptation of live, medium-sized Scombrids using "Tuna Tubes".

Bar I, Dutney L, Lee P, Yazawa R, Yoshizaki G, Takeuchi Y, Cummins S, Elizur A - Springerplus (2015)

Map of fishing area around BIRC, at south-east Queensland, Australia. Markers on map show points of interest: a Bribie Island Research Centre (BIRC). b Spinnaker Sound Marina. White shaded area shows fishing grounds covered during trips. Centre of map at coordinates S27°05ʹ06ʺ, E153°16ʹ00ʺ; scale bar on map is equivalent to 5 km
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4627978&req=5

Fig5: Map of fishing area around BIRC, at south-east Queensland, Australia. Markers on map show points of interest: a Bribie Island Research Centre (BIRC). b Spinnaker Sound Marina. White shaded area shows fishing grounds covered during trips. Centre of map at coordinates S27°05ʹ06ʺ, E153°16ʹ00ʺ; scale bar on map is equivalent to 5 km
Mentions: Within 1 h of the capture of the first fish, the boat set ashore to a landing site as proximate as possible to the BIRC, to reduce to a minimum the time the fish were kept in the transport unit. When surf conditions allowed (i.e. swell height below 1 m), the boat approached the beach closest to the research centre (Woorim Beach on Bribie Island, Fig. 5a), located within a maximum of 1 h boat ride from the fishing grounds. A team member waited at the beach with a Recreational Off-highway Vehicle (ROV) and a fish transport trailer, with a 1000 L oxygenated seawater holding tank. The pumps were disconnected from the tubes, which were unloaded from the boat and quickly loaded on the ROV and then driven up to the trailer. The tubes were transferred to the tank on the transport trailer and the pumps were re-installed and connected to a battery to pump freshly oxygenated seawater over the fish. The trailer was then driven to BIRC, where the tubes were detached again from the pumps and manually transferred and submerged into the assigned 100 m3 broodstock tank to release the fish (Additional file 1: Video S1; Bar 2013). Overall, the transportation from the boat to the fish tank took less than 15 min, out of which the fish were in the tubes without active water circulation for a maximum of 2 min. When surf conditions did not allow for an open beach approach, the fish were transferred from the boat to the transport trailer at the Spinnaker Sound Marina, which added an additional 1.5 h to the total transport time until the fish were placed in the designated broodstock tank in BIRC. Fish that did not survive the transport to BIRC were dissected and examined to determine their sex and gonad developmental stage. Gonado-somatic index (GSI) was calculated as the percentage of gonad weight from the total body weight.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: In this study, 19 fish were captured using rod and line and 42 % of the captured fish were transported alive in the custom-designed tuna tubes to an on-shore holding tank: five mackerel tuna (Euthynnus affinis) and three leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans).Out of these, just three (15.8 % of total fish) acclimatized to the tank's condition.Based on these results, we discuss an improved design of the tuna tubes that has the potential to increase survival rates and enable a simple and low cost method of transporting of live pelagic fish.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Science, Health, Education and Engineering, Genecology Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore DC, QLD 4558 Australia.

ABSTRACT
The transport of live fish is a crucial step to establish fish culture in captivity, and is especially challenging for species that have not been commonly cultured before, therefore transport and handling methods need to be optimized and tailored. This study describes the use of tuna tubes for small-scale transport of medium-sized pelagic fish from the Scombridae family. Tuna tubes are an array of vertical tubes that hold the fish, while fresh seawater is pumped up the tubes and through the fish mouth and gills, providing oxygen and removing wastes. In this study, 19 fish were captured using rod and line and 42 % of the captured fish were transported alive in the custom-designed tuna tubes to an on-shore holding tank: five mackerel tuna (Euthynnus affinis) and three leaping bonito (Cybiosarda elegans). Out of these, just three (15.8 % of total fish) acclimatized to the tank's condition. Based on these results, we discuss an improved design of the tuna tubes that has the potential to increase survival rates and enable a simple and low cost method of transporting of live pelagic fish.

No MeSH data available.