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Biodegradation of di-n-Butyl Phthalate by Achromobacter sp. Isolated from Rural Domestic Wastewater.

Jin D, Kong X, Li Y, Bai Z, Zhuang G, Zhuang X, Deng Y - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The effects of heavy metals (50 mg/L Cu(2+) and 500 mg/L Pb(2+)) and surfactants (100 mg/L SDS and 500 mg/L Tween 20) on DBP degradation were investigated.The results demonstrated that Cu(2+) and SDS severely inhibited DBP degradation and Pb(2+) weakly inhibited DBP degradation, while Tween 20 greatly enhanced DBP degradation.Furthermore, phthalate degradation genes were found to be located on a plasmid present in Achromobacter sp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China. dcjin@rcees.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT
A bacterial strain W-1, isolated from rural domestic wastewater, can utilize the environmental hormone di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) as the sole carbon and energy source. The isolated bacterium species was confirmed to belong to the genus Achromobacter based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The results of substrate utilization tests showed that the strain W-1 could utilize other common phthalates and phenol. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the optimal conditions for DBP degradation were pH 7.0, 35 °C, and an agitation rate of 175 rpm. Under these conditions, 500 mg/L of DBP was completely degraded within 30 h. The effects of heavy metals (50 mg/L Cu(2+) and 500 mg/L Pb(2+)) and surfactants (100 mg/L SDS and 500 mg/L Tween 20) on DBP degradation were investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+) and SDS severely inhibited DBP degradation and Pb(2+) weakly inhibited DBP degradation, while Tween 20 greatly enhanced DBP degradation. Furthermore, phthalate degradation genes were found to be located on a plasmid present in Achromobacter sp. W-1.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of heavy metals and surfactants on the degradation of DBP. Error bars are the SEM of DBP concentration from triplicate experiments.
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ijerph-12-13510-f004: Effects of heavy metals and surfactants on the degradation of DBP. Error bars are the SEM of DBP concentration from triplicate experiments.

Mentions: We examined how the degradation of DBP in culture medium was affected by the heavy metals Cu2+ (50 mg/L) and Pb2+ (500 mg/L), and the surfactants SDS (100 mg/L) and Tween 20 (500 mg/L). The results presented in Figure 4 show that strain W-1 completely degraded DBP in the absence of Cu2+ or Pb2+ within 30 h. However, W-1 was extremely sensitive to Cu2+ and SDS: almost no DBP degradation occurred in their presence. When Pb2+ was added to the reaction mixture, no marked effects on DBP degradation were observed; 98.2% of the DBP was degraded by 32 h and no DBP was detected at 40 h. Finally, Tween 20 substantially enhanced DBP degradation: no DBP was detected by 24 h when this surfactant was present. These results indicate that various environmental factors must be considered when conducting bioremediation of sites contaminated with PAEs.


Biodegradation of di-n-Butyl Phthalate by Achromobacter sp. Isolated from Rural Domestic Wastewater.

Jin D, Kong X, Li Y, Bai Z, Zhuang G, Zhuang X, Deng Y - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Effects of heavy metals and surfactants on the degradation of DBP. Error bars are the SEM of DBP concentration from triplicate experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4627046&req=5

ijerph-12-13510-f004: Effects of heavy metals and surfactants on the degradation of DBP. Error bars are the SEM of DBP concentration from triplicate experiments.
Mentions: We examined how the degradation of DBP in culture medium was affected by the heavy metals Cu2+ (50 mg/L) and Pb2+ (500 mg/L), and the surfactants SDS (100 mg/L) and Tween 20 (500 mg/L). The results presented in Figure 4 show that strain W-1 completely degraded DBP in the absence of Cu2+ or Pb2+ within 30 h. However, W-1 was extremely sensitive to Cu2+ and SDS: almost no DBP degradation occurred in their presence. When Pb2+ was added to the reaction mixture, no marked effects on DBP degradation were observed; 98.2% of the DBP was degraded by 32 h and no DBP was detected at 40 h. Finally, Tween 20 substantially enhanced DBP degradation: no DBP was detected by 24 h when this surfactant was present. These results indicate that various environmental factors must be considered when conducting bioremediation of sites contaminated with PAEs.

Bottom Line: The effects of heavy metals (50 mg/L Cu(2+) and 500 mg/L Pb(2+)) and surfactants (100 mg/L SDS and 500 mg/L Tween 20) on DBP degradation were investigated.The results demonstrated that Cu(2+) and SDS severely inhibited DBP degradation and Pb(2+) weakly inhibited DBP degradation, while Tween 20 greatly enhanced DBP degradation.Furthermore, phthalate degradation genes were found to be located on a plasmid present in Achromobacter sp.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Environmental Biotechnology, Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085, China. dcjin@rcees.ac.cn.

ABSTRACT
A bacterial strain W-1, isolated from rural domestic wastewater, can utilize the environmental hormone di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) as the sole carbon and energy source. The isolated bacterium species was confirmed to belong to the genus Achromobacter based on its 16S rRNA gene sequence. The results of substrate utilization tests showed that the strain W-1 could utilize other common phthalates and phenol. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the optimal conditions for DBP degradation were pH 7.0, 35 °C, and an agitation rate of 175 rpm. Under these conditions, 500 mg/L of DBP was completely degraded within 30 h. The effects of heavy metals (50 mg/L Cu(2+) and 500 mg/L Pb(2+)) and surfactants (100 mg/L SDS and 500 mg/L Tween 20) on DBP degradation were investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(2+) and SDS severely inhibited DBP degradation and Pb(2+) weakly inhibited DBP degradation, while Tween 20 greatly enhanced DBP degradation. Furthermore, phthalate degradation genes were found to be located on a plasmid present in Achromobacter sp. W-1.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus