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Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

Watanabe M, Noma H, Kurai J, Shimizu A, Sano H, Kato K, Mikami M, Ueda Y, Tatsukawa T, Ohga H, Yamasaki A, Igishi T, Kitano H, Shimizu E - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days.There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11).The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Rheumatology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8504, Japan. watanabm@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Patient selection flow chart, (PEF, peak expiratory flow).
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ijerph-12-13038-f001: Patient selection flow chart, (PEF, peak expiratory flow).

Mentions: A patient-selection flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of 151 study patients did not complete daily symptom diaries or PEF measurements during the practice period (February) and were subsequently excluded from the analysis (Figure 1). The remaining 137 patients consistently recorded daily respiratory symptoms and the PEF for >90% of the study period (March to May), and these 137 patients were included in the final analysis. Their characteristics are shown in Table 1. According to the GINA criteria, the treatment step, which corresponded to the patient’s asthma control level, was used in March 2013 [26].


Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

Watanabe M, Noma H, Kurai J, Shimizu A, Sano H, Kato K, Mikami M, Ueda Y, Tatsukawa T, Ohga H, Yamasaki A, Igishi T, Kitano H, Shimizu E - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Patient selection flow chart, (PEF, peak expiratory flow).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4627015&req=5

ijerph-12-13038-f001: Patient selection flow chart, (PEF, peak expiratory flow).
Mentions: A patient-selection flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of 151 study patients did not complete daily symptom diaries or PEF measurements during the practice period (February) and were subsequently excluded from the analysis (Figure 1). The remaining 137 patients consistently recorded daily respiratory symptoms and the PEF for >90% of the study period (March to May), and these 137 patients were included in the final analysis. Their characteristics are shown in Table 1. According to the GINA criteria, the treatment step, which corresponded to the patient’s asthma control level, was used in March 2013 [26].

Bottom Line: Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days.There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11).The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Rheumatology, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, 36-1 Nishi-cho, Yonago 683-8504, Japan. watanabm@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT
Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus