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Important Variables When Screening for Students at Suicidal Risk: Findings from the French Cohort of the SEYLE Study.

Kahn JP, Tubiana A, Cohen RF, Carli V, Wasserman C, Hoven C, Sarchiapone M, Wasserman D - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: According to the multivariate regression analysis of ProfScreen, the results show that the best predictors for treatment referral were NSSI (OR 2.85), alcohol misuse (OR 2.80), and depressive symptoms (OR 1.13).Qualitative analysis of clinician's motivations to refer a student to mental health services revealed that depressive symptoms (51%), anxiety (38%), suicidal behaviours (40%), and negative life events (35%) were the main reasons for referrals.Thus, not only the classical psychopathological symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviours, but also negative life events and poor social relationships (especially isolation) motivate referrals for treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Hôpitaux de Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy 54511, France. jp.kahn@chu-nancy.fr.

ABSTRACT
Due to early detection of mental ill-health being an important suicide preventive strategy, the multi-centre EU funded "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) study compared three school-based mental health promotion programs to a control group. In France, 1007 students with a mean age of 15.2 years were recruited from 20 randomly assigned schools. This paper explores the French results of the SEYLE's two-stage screening program (ProfScreen) and of the cross-program suicidal emergency procedure. Two-hundred-thirty-five ProfScreen students were screened using 13 psychopathological and risk behaviour scales. Students considered at risk because of a positive finding on one or more scales were offered a clinical interview and, if necessary, referred for treatment. A procedure for suicidal students (emergency cases) was set up to detect emergencies in the whole cohort (n = 1007). Emergency cases were offered the same clinical interview as the ProfScreen students. The interviewers documented their reasons for referrals in a short report. 16,2% of the ProfScreen students (38/235) were referred to treatment and 2,7% of the emergency cases (27/1007) were also referred to treatment due to high suicidal risk. Frequent symptoms in those students referred for evaluation were depression, alcohol misuse, non-suicidal self-injuries (NSSI), and suicidal behaviours. According to the multivariate regression analysis of ProfScreen, the results show that the best predictors for treatment referral were NSSI (OR 2.85), alcohol misuse (OR 2.80), and depressive symptoms (OR 1.13). Analysis of the proportion for each scale of students referred to treatment showed that poor social relationships (60%), anxiety (50%), and suicidal behaviours (50%) generated the highest rate of referrals. Qualitative analysis of clinician's motivations to refer a student to mental health services revealed that depressive symptoms (51%), anxiety (38%), suicidal behaviours (40%), and negative life events (35%) were the main reasons for referrals. Thus, not only the classical psychopathological symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviours, but also negative life events and poor social relationships (especially isolation) motivate referrals for treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Screening, interview, and referral procedures
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ijerph-12-12277-f001: Screening, interview, and referral procedures

Mentions: The SEYLE study is a multicenter clinical cluster-randomized controlled trial, funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union (FP7), and performed in 10 European Union countries and Israel. It is coordinated by the National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health at Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden). The SEYLE study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000214) for the 10 European countries, and, in Israel, at the US National Institute of Health (NIH) clinical trial registry (NCT00906620). It has received the authorization of the French Ethical Committees and related agencies (Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud-Méditerranée II Marseille 2; Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé; Comité Consultatif sur le Traitement de l’Information en matière de Recherche dans le domaine de la Santé). The detailed protocol has been published elsewhere [10]. The SEYLE study aimed at collecting epidemiological data on European adolescents’ health, well-being, and values using a self-report questionnaire and comparing preventive and mental health promotion programs. The SEYLE study tested and compared three different active programs to a control group (Figure 1):(1)


Important Variables When Screening for Students at Suicidal Risk: Findings from the French Cohort of the SEYLE Study.

Kahn JP, Tubiana A, Cohen RF, Carli V, Wasserman C, Hoven C, Sarchiapone M, Wasserman D - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Screening, interview, and referral procedures
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626968&req=5

ijerph-12-12277-f001: Screening, interview, and referral procedures
Mentions: The SEYLE study is a multicenter clinical cluster-randomized controlled trial, funded by the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union (FP7), and performed in 10 European Union countries and Israel. It is coordinated by the National Centre for Suicide Research and Prevention of Mental Ill-Health at Karolinska Institute (Stockholm, Sweden). The SEYLE study is registered at the German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS00000214) for the 10 European countries, and, in Israel, at the US National Institute of Health (NIH) clinical trial registry (NCT00906620). It has received the authorization of the French Ethical Committees and related agencies (Comité de Protection des Personnes Sud-Méditerranée II Marseille 2; Agence Francaise de Sécurité Sanitaire des Produits de Santé; Comité Consultatif sur le Traitement de l’Information en matière de Recherche dans le domaine de la Santé). The detailed protocol has been published elsewhere [10]. The SEYLE study aimed at collecting epidemiological data on European adolescents’ health, well-being, and values using a self-report questionnaire and comparing preventive and mental health promotion programs. The SEYLE study tested and compared three different active programs to a control group (Figure 1):(1)

Bottom Line: According to the multivariate regression analysis of ProfScreen, the results show that the best predictors for treatment referral were NSSI (OR 2.85), alcohol misuse (OR 2.80), and depressive symptoms (OR 1.13).Qualitative analysis of clinician's motivations to refer a student to mental health services revealed that depressive symptoms (51%), anxiety (38%), suicidal behaviours (40%), and negative life events (35%) were the main reasons for referrals.Thus, not only the classical psychopathological symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviours, but also negative life events and poor social relationships (especially isolation) motivate referrals for treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nancy, Hôpitaux de Brabois, Vandoeuvre les Nancy 54511, France. jp.kahn@chu-nancy.fr.

ABSTRACT
Due to early detection of mental ill-health being an important suicide preventive strategy, the multi-centre EU funded "Saving and Empowering Young Lives in Europe" (SEYLE) study compared three school-based mental health promotion programs to a control group. In France, 1007 students with a mean age of 15.2 years were recruited from 20 randomly assigned schools. This paper explores the French results of the SEYLE's two-stage screening program (ProfScreen) and of the cross-program suicidal emergency procedure. Two-hundred-thirty-five ProfScreen students were screened using 13 psychopathological and risk behaviour scales. Students considered at risk because of a positive finding on one or more scales were offered a clinical interview and, if necessary, referred for treatment. A procedure for suicidal students (emergency cases) was set up to detect emergencies in the whole cohort (n = 1007). Emergency cases were offered the same clinical interview as the ProfScreen students. The interviewers documented their reasons for referrals in a short report. 16,2% of the ProfScreen students (38/235) were referred to treatment and 2,7% of the emergency cases (27/1007) were also referred to treatment due to high suicidal risk. Frequent symptoms in those students referred for evaluation were depression, alcohol misuse, non-suicidal self-injuries (NSSI), and suicidal behaviours. According to the multivariate regression analysis of ProfScreen, the results show that the best predictors for treatment referral were NSSI (OR 2.85), alcohol misuse (OR 2.80), and depressive symptoms (OR 1.13). Analysis of the proportion for each scale of students referred to treatment showed that poor social relationships (60%), anxiety (50%), and suicidal behaviours (50%) generated the highest rate of referrals. Qualitative analysis of clinician's motivations to refer a student to mental health services revealed that depressive symptoms (51%), anxiety (38%), suicidal behaviours (40%), and negative life events (35%) were the main reasons for referrals. Thus, not only the classical psychopathological symptoms, such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal behaviours, but also negative life events and poor social relationships (especially isolation) motivate referrals for treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus