Limits...
A Comparative Land Use-Based Analysis of Noise Pollution Levels in Selected Urban Centers of Nigeria.

Baloye DO, Palamuleni LG - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: This study characterized noise pollution levels in Ibadan and Ile-Ife, two urban areas of Southwestern Nigeria that have experienced significant increases in population and land use activities.Findings put the average noise levels in the urban centers at between 53 dB(A) and 89 dB (A), a far cry from the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits in all the land use types, with highest noise pollution levels recorded for transportation, commercial, residential and educational land use types.The result of the one-way ANOVA test carried out on the dependent variable noise and fixed factor land use types reveals a statistically significant mean noise levels across the study area (F(3,34) = 15.13, p = 0.000).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences, North West University, Mafikeng Campus, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho, 2735, South Africa. 27335550@nwu.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Growth in the commercialization, mobility and urbanization of human settlements across the globe has greatly exposed world urban population to potentially harmful noise levels. The situation is more disturbing in developing countries like Nigeria, where there are no sacrosanct noise laws and regulations. This study characterized noise pollution levels in Ibadan and Ile-Ife, two urban areas of Southwestern Nigeria that have experienced significant increases in population and land use activities. Eight hundred noise measurements, taken at 20 different positions in the morning, afternoon, and evening of carefully selected weekdays, in each urban area, were used for this study. Findings put the average noise levels in the urban centers at between 53 dB(A) and 89 dB (A), a far cry from the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits in all the land use types, with highest noise pollution levels recorded for transportation, commercial, residential and educational land use types. The result of the one-way ANOVA test carried out on the dependent variable noise and fixed factor land use types reveals a statistically significant mean noise levels across the study area (F(3,34) = 15.13, p = 0.000). The study underscores noise pollution monitoring and the urgent need to control urban noise pollution with appropriate and effective policies.

No MeSH data available.


Percentage of noise distribution in Ibadan.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626965&req=5

ijerph-12-12225-f005: Percentage of noise distribution in Ibadan.

Mentions: Figure 5 reveals that 25%, 20%, and 10% of places in Ibadan are within the extremely dangerous zone (ED) in the mornings, afternoons, and evenings, respectively, while a larger percentage of the city is found within dangerous zone (D) of between 70 dB(A) and75 dB(A) in the mornings (30%), afternoons (30%), and evenings (40%). However, some of the places in Ibadan City are within the moderately risky (MR) range in the mornings, afternoons, and evenings, with the remaining places alternating between highly dangerous zone (HD) and highly risky (HR) at different periods of the day.


A Comparative Land Use-Based Analysis of Noise Pollution Levels in Selected Urban Centers of Nigeria.

Baloye DO, Palamuleni LG - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Percentage of noise distribution in Ibadan.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626965&req=5

ijerph-12-12225-f005: Percentage of noise distribution in Ibadan.
Mentions: Figure 5 reveals that 25%, 20%, and 10% of places in Ibadan are within the extremely dangerous zone (ED) in the mornings, afternoons, and evenings, respectively, while a larger percentage of the city is found within dangerous zone (D) of between 70 dB(A) and75 dB(A) in the mornings (30%), afternoons (30%), and evenings (40%). However, some of the places in Ibadan City are within the moderately risky (MR) range in the mornings, afternoons, and evenings, with the remaining places alternating between highly dangerous zone (HD) and highly risky (HR) at different periods of the day.

Bottom Line: This study characterized noise pollution levels in Ibadan and Ile-Ife, two urban areas of Southwestern Nigeria that have experienced significant increases in population and land use activities.Findings put the average noise levels in the urban centers at between 53 dB(A) and 89 dB (A), a far cry from the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits in all the land use types, with highest noise pollution levels recorded for transportation, commercial, residential and educational land use types.The result of the one-way ANOVA test carried out on the dependent variable noise and fixed factor land use types reveals a statistically significant mean noise levels across the study area (F(3,34) = 15.13, p = 0.000).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences, North West University, Mafikeng Campus, Private Bag X2046, Mmabatho, 2735, South Africa. 27335550@nwu.ac.za.

ABSTRACT
Growth in the commercialization, mobility and urbanization of human settlements across the globe has greatly exposed world urban population to potentially harmful noise levels. The situation is more disturbing in developing countries like Nigeria, where there are no sacrosanct noise laws and regulations. This study characterized noise pollution levels in Ibadan and Ile-Ife, two urban areas of Southwestern Nigeria that have experienced significant increases in population and land use activities. Eight hundred noise measurements, taken at 20 different positions in the morning, afternoon, and evening of carefully selected weekdays, in each urban area, were used for this study. Findings put the average noise levels in the urban centers at between 53 dB(A) and 89 dB (A), a far cry from the World Health Organization (WHO) permissible limits in all the land use types, with highest noise pollution levels recorded for transportation, commercial, residential and educational land use types. The result of the one-way ANOVA test carried out on the dependent variable noise and fixed factor land use types reveals a statistically significant mean noise levels across the study area (F(3,34) = 15.13, p = 0.000). The study underscores noise pollution monitoring and the urgent need to control urban noise pollution with appropriate and effective policies.

No MeSH data available.