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Healthy Aging Promotion through Neuroscientific Information-Based Strategies.

Seinfeld S, Sanchez-Vives MV - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Preliminary results indicate that neuroscientific information-based strategies can be a useful method to have a positive impact on the lives of elderly, increase their awareness on how to improve brain function and promote positive lifestyle modifications.Furthermore, based on self-reported data, we also found that through this strategy it is possible to promote behavioral changes related to nutrition, sleep, and realization of physical and cognitively stimulating activities.Finally, based on the results obtained, the importance of promoting self-efficacy and the empowerment of the older populations is highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), 08036 Barcelona, Spain. seinfeld@clinic.ub.edu.

ABSTRACT
To ensure the well-being of a rapidly growing elderly population, it is fundamental to find strategies to foster healthy brain aging. With this intention, we designed a program of scientific-based lectures aimed at dissemination by established neuroscientists about brain function, brain plasticity and how lifestyle influences the brain. We also carried out a pilot study on the impact of the lectures on attendees. The objective was to provide information to elderly people in order to encourage them to identify unhealthy and healthy daily habits, and more importantly, to promote behavioral changes towards healthy brain aging. Here we report on our experience. In order to determine the impact of the lectures in the daily routine of the attendees, we asked them to fill out questionnaires. Preliminary results indicate that neuroscientific information-based strategies can be a useful method to have a positive impact on the lives of elderly, increase their awareness on how to improve brain function and promote positive lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, based on self-reported data, we also found that through this strategy it is possible to promote behavioral changes related to nutrition, sleep, and realization of physical and cognitively stimulating activities. Finally, based on the results obtained, the importance of promoting self-efficacy and the empowerment of the older populations is highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Scatter plots showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of the elderly and the extent to which the respondents improved their nutritional habits; (B) Scatter plot showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of elderly and extent to which the respondents increased the frequency of practice of physical activity.
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ijerph-12-12158-f001: (A) Scatter plots showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of the elderly and the extent to which the respondents improved their nutritional habits; (B) Scatter plot showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of elderly and extent to which the respondents increased the frequency of practice of physical activity.

Mentions: Table 3 summarizes the self-reported ratings given on questions which assessed the degree in which respondents carried out changes in order to improve their nutrition, cardiovascular health, physical activity, the practice of cognitively stimulating activities and sleep quality. As it can be seen, all of the scores tend to have medium to high ratings, which means that after attending the lectures, the respondents had already made some type of changes towards improving on these specific behaviors, although these changes were not extreme. Interestingly, we found a positive correlation between the subjective perception about the learning capacity of older adults after attending the talks (question 4) and the extent to which respondents made changes in order to improve their nutrition, r = 0.67, p < 0.01, and the frequency in which they practiced physical activity, r = 0.56, p < 0.01 (see Figure 1A,B). In order to assess if a higher number of attended lectures predicted better outcomes we run a correlation analysis. However, no significant correlations were found between the number of attended lectures and the questionnaire responses. Furthermore, a correlational analysis between the age of attendees and the questionnaire responses revealed just one significant difference. A negative correlation between the age of attendees and the degree of interest to play a musical instrument was found, r = −0.46, p < 0.02. This correlation indicates that participants with a more advanced age had less interest in learning a musical instrument.


Healthy Aging Promotion through Neuroscientific Information-Based Strategies.

Seinfeld S, Sanchez-Vives MV - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

(A) Scatter plots showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of the elderly and the extent to which the respondents improved their nutritional habits; (B) Scatter plot showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of elderly and extent to which the respondents increased the frequency of practice of physical activity.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626961&req=5

ijerph-12-12158-f001: (A) Scatter plots showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of the elderly and the extent to which the respondents improved their nutritional habits; (B) Scatter plot showing the positive correlation between the increases of the subjective perception about the learning capacity of elderly and extent to which the respondents increased the frequency of practice of physical activity.
Mentions: Table 3 summarizes the self-reported ratings given on questions which assessed the degree in which respondents carried out changes in order to improve their nutrition, cardiovascular health, physical activity, the practice of cognitively stimulating activities and sleep quality. As it can be seen, all of the scores tend to have medium to high ratings, which means that after attending the lectures, the respondents had already made some type of changes towards improving on these specific behaviors, although these changes were not extreme. Interestingly, we found a positive correlation between the subjective perception about the learning capacity of older adults after attending the talks (question 4) and the extent to which respondents made changes in order to improve their nutrition, r = 0.67, p < 0.01, and the frequency in which they practiced physical activity, r = 0.56, p < 0.01 (see Figure 1A,B). In order to assess if a higher number of attended lectures predicted better outcomes we run a correlation analysis. However, no significant correlations were found between the number of attended lectures and the questionnaire responses. Furthermore, a correlational analysis between the age of attendees and the questionnaire responses revealed just one significant difference. A negative correlation between the age of attendees and the degree of interest to play a musical instrument was found, r = −0.46, p < 0.02. This correlation indicates that participants with a more advanced age had less interest in learning a musical instrument.

Bottom Line: Preliminary results indicate that neuroscientific information-based strategies can be a useful method to have a positive impact on the lives of elderly, increase their awareness on how to improve brain function and promote positive lifestyle modifications.Furthermore, based on self-reported data, we also found that through this strategy it is possible to promote behavioral changes related to nutrition, sleep, and realization of physical and cognitively stimulating activities.Finally, based on the results obtained, the importance of promoting self-efficacy and the empowerment of the older populations is highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), 08036 Barcelona, Spain. seinfeld@clinic.ub.edu.

ABSTRACT
To ensure the well-being of a rapidly growing elderly population, it is fundamental to find strategies to foster healthy brain aging. With this intention, we designed a program of scientific-based lectures aimed at dissemination by established neuroscientists about brain function, brain plasticity and how lifestyle influences the brain. We also carried out a pilot study on the impact of the lectures on attendees. The objective was to provide information to elderly people in order to encourage them to identify unhealthy and healthy daily habits, and more importantly, to promote behavioral changes towards healthy brain aging. Here we report on our experience. In order to determine the impact of the lectures in the daily routine of the attendees, we asked them to fill out questionnaires. Preliminary results indicate that neuroscientific information-based strategies can be a useful method to have a positive impact on the lives of elderly, increase their awareness on how to improve brain function and promote positive lifestyle modifications. Furthermore, based on self-reported data, we also found that through this strategy it is possible to promote behavioral changes related to nutrition, sleep, and realization of physical and cognitively stimulating activities. Finally, based on the results obtained, the importance of promoting self-efficacy and the empowerment of the older populations is highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus