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Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

Peckham EC, Scheurer ME, Danysh HE, Lubega J, Langlois PH, Lupo PJ - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315).Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91).In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS BCM305, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Erin.Peckham@bcm.edu.

ABSTRACT
There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Quartile distribution of residential radon exposure from The Texas Indoor Radon Survey, 1991.
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ijerph-12-12110-f001: Quartile distribution of residential radon exposure from The Texas Indoor Radon Survey, 1991.

Mentions: In order to evaluate incidence of childhood lymphoma, regional mean radon concentrations were assessed categorically comparing the regions with “medium-low” radon concentrations (>25th to ≤50th percentile; >25.9 to ≤40.7 Bq/m3), “medium-high” radon concentrations (>50th to ≤75th percentile; >40.7 to ≤48.1 Bq/m3), and the “highest” radon concentrations (>75th percentile; >48.1 Bq/m3) to regions with the “lowest” radon concentrations (≤25th percentile; ≤25.9 Bq/m3). Cut-points were based on the distribution across the state (Figure 1). All analyses were conducted using STATA (version 13, StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA).


Residential Radon Exposure and Incidence of Childhood Lymphoma in Texas, 1995-2011.

Peckham EC, Scheurer ME, Danysh HE, Lubega J, Langlois PH, Lupo PJ - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Quartile distribution of residential radon exposure from The Texas Indoor Radon Survey, 1991.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626958&req=5

ijerph-12-12110-f001: Quartile distribution of residential radon exposure from The Texas Indoor Radon Survey, 1991.
Mentions: In order to evaluate incidence of childhood lymphoma, regional mean radon concentrations were assessed categorically comparing the regions with “medium-low” radon concentrations (>25th to ≤50th percentile; >25.9 to ≤40.7 Bq/m3), “medium-high” radon concentrations (>50th to ≤75th percentile; >40.7 to ≤48.1 Bq/m3), and the “highest” radon concentrations (>75th percentile; >48.1 Bq/m3) to regions with the “lowest” radon concentrations (≤25th percentile; ≤25.9 Bq/m3). Cut-points were based on the distribution across the state (Figure 1). All analyses were conducted using STATA (version 13, StataCorp, College Station, TX, USA).

Bottom Line: We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315).Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91).In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Section of Hematology-Oncology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS BCM305, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Erin.Peckham@bcm.edu.

ABSTRACT
There is warranted interest in assessing the association between residential radon exposure and the risk of childhood cancer. We sought to evaluate the association between residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma in Texas. The Texas Cancer Registry (n = 2147) provided case information for the period 1995-2011. Denominator data were obtained from the United States Census. Regional arithmetic mean radon concentrations were obtained from the Texas Indoor Radon Survey and linked to residence at diagnosis. Exposure was assessed categorically: ≤25th percentile (reference), >25th to ≤50th percentile, >50th to ≤75th percentile, and >75th percentile. Negative binomial regression generated adjusted incidence rate ratios (aIRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We evaluated lymphoma overall and by subtype: Hodgkin (HL; n = 1248), Non-Hodgkin excluding Burkitt (non-BL NHL; n = 658), Burkitt (BL; n = 241), and Diffuse Large B-cell (DLBCL; n = 315). There was no evidence that residential radon exposure was positively associated with lymphoma overall, HL, or BL. Areas with radon concentrations >75th percentile had a marginal increase in DLBCL incidence (aIRR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.03-2.91). In one of the largest studies of residential radon exposure and the incidence of childhood lymphoma, we found little evidence to suggest a positive or negative association; an observation consistent with previous studies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus