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Climate Change and Its Impact on the Eco-Environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

Jiang C, Zhang L - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB).The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes.A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. jiangchong1987@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This study analyzes the impact of climate change on the eco-environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR), Tibetan Plateau, China. Temperature and precipitation experienced sharp increases in this region during the past 57 years. A dramatic increase in winter temperatures contributed to a rise in average annual temperatures. Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB). Runoff is predominantly influenced by rainfall, which is controlled by several monsoon systems. The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes. Additionally, owing to warming and wetting trends in the TRHR, the net primary productivity (NPP) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) showed significant increasing trends during the past half-century. Furthermore, although an increase in water erosion due to rainfall erosivity was observed, wind speeds declined significantly, causing a decline in wind erosion, as well as the frequency and duration of sandstorms. A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Temporal variations in (a) net primary productivity (NPP) from 1956 to 2012 and (b) the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 1982 to 2012 in the TRHR.
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ijerph-12-12057-f008: Temporal variations in (a) net primary productivity (NPP) from 1956 to 2012 and (b) the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 1982 to 2012 in the TRHR.

Mentions: Owing to the TRHR warming and wetting trends, which provide sufficient water and heat for vegetation growth, the net primary productivity (NPP) showed a significant increasing trend during 1956 to 2012, with a slope of 13.53 kg C/(hm2 a) (p < 0.001) (Figure 8a). Regarding the spatial distribution, the NPP increased from southeastern to northwestern areas of the TRHR, with NPPs in the southern YAR and LRB obviously higher than those in the northwestern YARB. From 1956 to 2012, the regions with the most rapid increases in NPP were the southern YRB and LRB. The NDVI in 1982 to 2012, derived from GIMMS and MODIS products, also presented a significant increasing trend with a slope of 0.0025/a (p < 0.001) and was closely correlated with NPP and rainfall, as shown in Figure 8b (the correlation coefficient is 0.36 (p < 0.01)).


Climate Change and Its Impact on the Eco-Environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region on the Tibetan Plateau, China.

Jiang C, Zhang L - Int J Environ Res Public Health (2015)

Temporal variations in (a) net primary productivity (NPP) from 1956 to 2012 and (b) the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 1982 to 2012 in the TRHR.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626955&req=5

ijerph-12-12057-f008: Temporal variations in (a) net primary productivity (NPP) from 1956 to 2012 and (b) the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from 1982 to 2012 in the TRHR.
Mentions: Owing to the TRHR warming and wetting trends, which provide sufficient water and heat for vegetation growth, the net primary productivity (NPP) showed a significant increasing trend during 1956 to 2012, with a slope of 13.53 kg C/(hm2 a) (p < 0.001) (Figure 8a). Regarding the spatial distribution, the NPP increased from southeastern to northwestern areas of the TRHR, with NPPs in the southern YAR and LRB obviously higher than those in the northwestern YARB. From 1956 to 2012, the regions with the most rapid increases in NPP were the southern YRB and LRB. The NDVI in 1982 to 2012, derived from GIMMS and MODIS products, also presented a significant increasing trend with a slope of 0.0025/a (p < 0.001) and was closely correlated with NPP and rainfall, as shown in Figure 8b (the correlation coefficient is 0.36 (p < 0.01)).

Bottom Line: Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB).The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes.A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875, China. jiangchong1987@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT
This study analyzes the impact of climate change on the eco-environment of the Three-Rivers Headwater Region (TRHR), Tibetan Plateau, China. Temperature and precipitation experienced sharp increases in this region during the past 57 years. A dramatic increase in winter temperatures contributed to a rise in average annual temperatures. Moreover, annual runoff in the Lancang (LRB) and Yangtze (YARB) river basins showed an increasing trend, compared to a slight decrease in the Yellow River Basin (YRB). Runoff is predominantly influenced by rainfall, which is controlled by several monsoon systems. The water temperature in the YRB and YARB increased significantly from 1958 to 2007 (p < 0.001), driven by air temperature changes. Additionally, owing to warming and wetting trends in the TRHR, the net primary productivity (NPP) and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) showed significant increasing trends during the past half-century. Furthermore, although an increase in water erosion due to rainfall erosivity was observed, wind speeds declined significantly, causing a decline in wind erosion, as well as the frequency and duration of sandstorms. A clear regional warming trend caused an obvious increasing trend in glacier runoff, with a maximum value observed in the 2000s.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus