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Proteomic Analysis of the Relationship between Metabolism and Nonhost Resistance in Soybean Exposed to Bipolaris maydis.

Dong Y, Su Y, Yu P, Yang M, Zhu S, Mei X, He X, Pan M, Zhu Y, Li C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans.Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis.This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Agro-Biodiversity and Pest Management of Education Ministry of China, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
Nonhost resistance (NHR) pertains to the most common form of plant resistance against pathogenic microorganisms of other species. Bipolaris maydis is a non-adapted pathogen affecting soybeans, particularly of maize/soybean intercropping systems. However, no experimental evidence has described the immune response of soybeans against B. maydis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NHR in soybeans, proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to identify proteins involved in the soybean response to B. maydis. The spread of B. maydis spores across soybean leaves induced NHR throughout the plant, which mobilized almost all organelles and various metabolic processes in response to B. maydis. Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans. These enzymes have been identified in previous studies, and STRING analysis showed that most of the protein functions related to major metabolic processes were induced as a response to B. maydis, which suggested an array of complex interactions between soybeans and B. maydis. These findings suggest a systematic NHR against non-adapted pathogens in soybeans. This response was characterized by an overlap between metabolic processes and response to stimulus. Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis. This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

No MeSH data available.


Arabidopsis DB-based BLAST analysis of the interaction network of 64 differentially expressed proteins in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybean plants in response to B. maydis.GO analysis indicated that the 38 red nodes in A might be involved in metabolic processes (P value = 1.070e −10). Another 35 red nodes in B were involved in stimulus response (P value = 3.970e −10). Thirty proteins belonged to the both metabolic process and response to stimulus, which suggested that the same protein could perform different functions in soybean plants in response to B. maydis stress.
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pone.0141264.g005: Arabidopsis DB-based BLAST analysis of the interaction network of 64 differentially expressed proteins in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybean plants in response to B. maydis.GO analysis indicated that the 38 red nodes in A might be involved in metabolic processes (P value = 1.070e −10). Another 35 red nodes in B were involved in stimulus response (P value = 3.970e −10). Thirty proteins belonged to the both metabolic process and response to stimulus, which suggested that the same protein could perform different functions in soybean plants in response to B. maydis stress.

Mentions: Analysis of the interactions among 64 proteins differentially expressed in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybeans in response to B. maydis provided further bioinformatic evidence of the overlap between metabolism and stimulus response. This analysis was performed using STRING (Fig 5). The results suggested that ~80% of proteins were involved in metabolic processes (P = 1.070e -10) and response to stimulus (P = 3.970e -10). For example, LOS2 is a copper ion binding/phosphopyruvate hydratase. It encodes an enolase that is involved in light-dependent cold tolerance. Its protein is tyrosine-phosphorylated and its phosphorylation state is modulated in response to ABA in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds (www.string.db.org) (Fig 5). BLAST analysis using the Arabidopsis DB was performed. These proteins belonged to both the response pathway and biological processes. This theoretical overlap of metabolism and defense processes was consistent with the observed overlap between metabolic and defense processes (Fig 4, Tables 1–3).


Proteomic Analysis of the Relationship between Metabolism and Nonhost Resistance in Soybean Exposed to Bipolaris maydis.

Dong Y, Su Y, Yu P, Yang M, Zhu S, Mei X, He X, Pan M, Zhu Y, Li C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Arabidopsis DB-based BLAST analysis of the interaction network of 64 differentially expressed proteins in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybean plants in response to B. maydis.GO analysis indicated that the 38 red nodes in A might be involved in metabolic processes (P value = 1.070e −10). Another 35 red nodes in B were involved in stimulus response (P value = 3.970e −10). Thirty proteins belonged to the both metabolic process and response to stimulus, which suggested that the same protein could perform different functions in soybean plants in response to B. maydis stress.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626022&req=5

pone.0141264.g005: Arabidopsis DB-based BLAST analysis of the interaction network of 64 differentially expressed proteins in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybean plants in response to B. maydis.GO analysis indicated that the 38 red nodes in A might be involved in metabolic processes (P value = 1.070e −10). Another 35 red nodes in B were involved in stimulus response (P value = 3.970e −10). Thirty proteins belonged to the both metabolic process and response to stimulus, which suggested that the same protein could perform different functions in soybean plants in response to B. maydis stress.
Mentions: Analysis of the interactions among 64 proteins differentially expressed in the roots, stems, and leaves of soybeans in response to B. maydis provided further bioinformatic evidence of the overlap between metabolism and stimulus response. This analysis was performed using STRING (Fig 5). The results suggested that ~80% of proteins were involved in metabolic processes (P = 1.070e -10) and response to stimulus (P = 3.970e -10). For example, LOS2 is a copper ion binding/phosphopyruvate hydratase. It encodes an enolase that is involved in light-dependent cold tolerance. Its protein is tyrosine-phosphorylated and its phosphorylation state is modulated in response to ABA in Arabidopsis thaliana seeds (www.string.db.org) (Fig 5). BLAST analysis using the Arabidopsis DB was performed. These proteins belonged to both the response pathway and biological processes. This theoretical overlap of metabolism and defense processes was consistent with the observed overlap between metabolic and defense processes (Fig 4, Tables 1–3).

Bottom Line: Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans.Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis.This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Agro-Biodiversity and Pest Management of Education Ministry of China, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
Nonhost resistance (NHR) pertains to the most common form of plant resistance against pathogenic microorganisms of other species. Bipolaris maydis is a non-adapted pathogen affecting soybeans, particularly of maize/soybean intercropping systems. However, no experimental evidence has described the immune response of soybeans against B. maydis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NHR in soybeans, proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to identify proteins involved in the soybean response to B. maydis. The spread of B. maydis spores across soybean leaves induced NHR throughout the plant, which mobilized almost all organelles and various metabolic processes in response to B. maydis. Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans. These enzymes have been identified in previous studies, and STRING analysis showed that most of the protein functions related to major metabolic processes were induced as a response to B. maydis, which suggested an array of complex interactions between soybeans and B. maydis. These findings suggest a systematic NHR against non-adapted pathogens in soybeans. This response was characterized by an overlap between metabolic processes and response to stimulus. Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis. This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

No MeSH data available.