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Proteomic Analysis of the Relationship between Metabolism and Nonhost Resistance in Soybean Exposed to Bipolaris maydis.

Dong Y, Su Y, Yu P, Yang M, Zhu S, Mei X, He X, Pan M, Zhu Y, Li C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans.Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis.This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Agro-Biodiversity and Pest Management of Education Ministry of China, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
Nonhost resistance (NHR) pertains to the most common form of plant resistance against pathogenic microorganisms of other species. Bipolaris maydis is a non-adapted pathogen affecting soybeans, particularly of maize/soybean intercropping systems. However, no experimental evidence has described the immune response of soybeans against B. maydis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NHR in soybeans, proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to identify proteins involved in the soybean response to B. maydis. The spread of B. maydis spores across soybean leaves induced NHR throughout the plant, which mobilized almost all organelles and various metabolic processes in response to B. maydis. Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans. These enzymes have been identified in previous studies, and STRING analysis showed that most of the protein functions related to major metabolic processes were induced as a response to B. maydis, which suggested an array of complex interactions between soybeans and B. maydis. These findings suggest a systematic NHR against non-adapted pathogens in soybeans. This response was characterized by an overlap between metabolic processes and response to stimulus. Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis. This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Two-DE map of root proteins responding to B. maydis.S1 and S15 were zoomed in the protein spot 1 and spot 15 differentially expressed under the B. maydis stress; “C” refers to the protein spot excised from the control gel, and “T” refers to the protein spot excised from the treatment gel. The differential abundance of proteins was determined using the PDQuest software and was plotted as the relative intensity enumerated as ES1 and ES15. ES1 and ES15 represent the relative expression between control and treatment of protein spot 1 and spot 15, “C” means control, and “T” indicates treatment. S1/ES1 and S15/ES15 are representative differentially expressed root proteins.
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pone.0141264.g003: Two-DE map of root proteins responding to B. maydis.S1 and S15 were zoomed in the protein spot 1 and spot 15 differentially expressed under the B. maydis stress; “C” refers to the protein spot excised from the control gel, and “T” refers to the protein spot excised from the treatment gel. The differential abundance of proteins was determined using the PDQuest software and was plotted as the relative intensity enumerated as ES1 and ES15. ES1 and ES15 represent the relative expression between control and treatment of protein spot 1 and spot 15, “C” means control, and “T” indicates treatment. S1/ES1 and S15/ES15 are representative differentially expressed root proteins.

Mentions: We investigated the patterns of root protein expression in response to B. maydis challenge on leaves (Fig 3).


Proteomic Analysis of the Relationship between Metabolism and Nonhost Resistance in Soybean Exposed to Bipolaris maydis.

Dong Y, Su Y, Yu P, Yang M, Zhu S, Mei X, He X, Pan M, Zhu Y, Li C - PLoS ONE (2015)

Two-DE map of root proteins responding to B. maydis.S1 and S15 were zoomed in the protein spot 1 and spot 15 differentially expressed under the B. maydis stress; “C” refers to the protein spot excised from the control gel, and “T” refers to the protein spot excised from the treatment gel. The differential abundance of proteins was determined using the PDQuest software and was plotted as the relative intensity enumerated as ES1 and ES15. ES1 and ES15 represent the relative expression between control and treatment of protein spot 1 and spot 15, “C” means control, and “T” indicates treatment. S1/ES1 and S15/ES15 are representative differentially expressed root proteins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4626022&req=5

pone.0141264.g003: Two-DE map of root proteins responding to B. maydis.S1 and S15 were zoomed in the protein spot 1 and spot 15 differentially expressed under the B. maydis stress; “C” refers to the protein spot excised from the control gel, and “T” refers to the protein spot excised from the treatment gel. The differential abundance of proteins was determined using the PDQuest software and was plotted as the relative intensity enumerated as ES1 and ES15. ES1 and ES15 represent the relative expression between control and treatment of protein spot 1 and spot 15, “C” means control, and “T” indicates treatment. S1/ES1 and S15/ES15 are representative differentially expressed root proteins.
Mentions: We investigated the patterns of root protein expression in response to B. maydis challenge on leaves (Fig 3).

Bottom Line: Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans.Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis.This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Agro-Biodiversity and Pest Management of Education Ministry of China, Yunnan Agricultural University, Kunming, 650201, China.

ABSTRACT
Nonhost resistance (NHR) pertains to the most common form of plant resistance against pathogenic microorganisms of other species. Bipolaris maydis is a non-adapted pathogen affecting soybeans, particularly of maize/soybean intercropping systems. However, no experimental evidence has described the immune response of soybeans against B. maydis. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying NHR in soybeans, proteomics analysis based on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2-DE) was performed to identify proteins involved in the soybean response to B. maydis. The spread of B. maydis spores across soybean leaves induced NHR throughout the plant, which mobilized almost all organelles and various metabolic processes in response to B. maydis. Some enzymes, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP), oxygen evolving enhancer (OEE), and nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDKs), were found to be related to NHR in soybeans. These enzymes have been identified in previous studies, and STRING analysis showed that most of the protein functions related to major metabolic processes were induced as a response to B. maydis, which suggested an array of complex interactions between soybeans and B. maydis. These findings suggest a systematic NHR against non-adapted pathogens in soybeans. This response was characterized by an overlap between metabolic processes and response to stimulus. Several metabolic processes provide the soybean with innate immunity to the non-adapted pathogen, B. maydis. This research investigation on NHR in soybeans may foster a better understanding of plant innate immunity, as well as the interactions between plant and non-adapted pathogens in intercropping systems.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus