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Exploiting the aerobic endospore-forming bacterial diversity in saline and hypersaline environments for biosurfactant production.

de Almeida Couto CR, Alvarez VM, Marques JM, de Azevedo Jurelevicius D, Seldin L - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The stability of the emulsification values varied when the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20% NaCl.The presence of surfactin was demonstrated in one of the most promising strains.Various endospore-forming bacterial genera/species are presented for the first time as biosurfactant producers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Genética Microbiana, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bloco I, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21941-590, Brazil. camilarattes@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biosurfactants are surface-active biomolecules with great applicability in the food, pharmaceutical and oil industries. Endospore-forming bacteria, which survive for long periods in harsh environments, are described as biosurfactant producers. Although the ubiquity of endospore-forming bacteria in saline and hypersaline environments is well known, studies on the diversity of the endospore-forming and biosurfactant-producing bacterial genera/species in these habitats are underrepresented.

Methods: In this study, the structure of endospore-forming bacterial communities in sediment/mud samples from Vermelha Lagoon, Massambaba, Dois Rios and Abraão Beaches (saline environments), as well as the Praia Seca salterns (hypersaline environments) was determined via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Bacterial strains were isolated from these environmental samples and further identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Strains presenting emulsification values higher than 30 % were grouped via BOX-PCR, and the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20 % NaCl to test their emulsifying activities in these extreme conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis was used to demonstrate the presence of surfactin.

Results: A diverse endospore-forming bacterial community was observed in all environments. The 110 bacterial strains isolated from these environmental samples were molecularly identified as belonging to the genera Bacillus, Thalassobacillus, Halobacillus, Paenibacillus, Fictibacillus and Paenisporosarcina. Fifty-two strains showed emulsification values of at least 30%, and they were grouped into 18 BOX groups. The stability of the emulsification values varied when the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20% NaCl. The presence of surfactin was demonstrated in one of the most promising strains.

Conclusion: The environments studied can harbor endospore-forming bacteria capable of producing biosurfactants with biotechnological applications. Various endospore-forming bacterial genera/species are presented for the first time as biosurfactant producers.

No MeSH data available.


ESI–MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in negative ion mode of the crude extracts of four strains: (a) Commercial surfactin (Sigma Aldrich) used as positive control, (b) B. asahii DR 2.0, (c) B. subtilis AB 2.0, (d) B. infantis VM 6.0 and (e) B. infantis VM 8.0
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Fig6: ESI–MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in negative ion mode of the crude extracts of four strains: (a) Commercial surfactin (Sigma Aldrich) used as positive control, (b) B. asahii DR 2.0, (c) B. subtilis AB 2.0, (d) B. infantis VM 6.0 and (e) B. infantis VM 8.0

Mentions: The production of surfactin was analyzed in four biosurfactant-producing bacteria (DR 2.0, AB 2.0, VM 6.0 and VM 8.0). A cluster of peaks with mass/charge (m/z) ratios between 1020 and 1034, which could be attributed to surfactin isoforms, was observed only in the control (commercial surfactin; Fig. 6a) and in AB 2.0, identified as B. subtilis (Fig. 6c).Fig. 6


Exploiting the aerobic endospore-forming bacterial diversity in saline and hypersaline environments for biosurfactant production.

de Almeida Couto CR, Alvarez VM, Marques JM, de Azevedo Jurelevicius D, Seldin L - BMC Microbiol. (2015)

ESI–MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in negative ion mode of the crude extracts of four strains: (a) Commercial surfactin (Sigma Aldrich) used as positive control, (b) B. asahii DR 2.0, (c) B. subtilis AB 2.0, (d) B. infantis VM 6.0 and (e) B. infantis VM 8.0
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4625932&req=5

Fig6: ESI–MS/MS triple quadrupole mass spectrometry in negative ion mode of the crude extracts of four strains: (a) Commercial surfactin (Sigma Aldrich) used as positive control, (b) B. asahii DR 2.0, (c) B. subtilis AB 2.0, (d) B. infantis VM 6.0 and (e) B. infantis VM 8.0
Mentions: The production of surfactin was analyzed in four biosurfactant-producing bacteria (DR 2.0, AB 2.0, VM 6.0 and VM 8.0). A cluster of peaks with mass/charge (m/z) ratios between 1020 and 1034, which could be attributed to surfactin isoforms, was observed only in the control (commercial surfactin; Fig. 6a) and in AB 2.0, identified as B. subtilis (Fig. 6c).Fig. 6

Bottom Line: The stability of the emulsification values varied when the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20% NaCl.The presence of surfactin was demonstrated in one of the most promising strains.Various endospore-forming bacterial genera/species are presented for the first time as biosurfactant producers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratório de Genética Microbiana, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Centro de Ciências da Saúde, Bloco I, Ilha do Fundão, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21941-590, Brazil. camilarattes@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Biosurfactants are surface-active biomolecules with great applicability in the food, pharmaceutical and oil industries. Endospore-forming bacteria, which survive for long periods in harsh environments, are described as biosurfactant producers. Although the ubiquity of endospore-forming bacteria in saline and hypersaline environments is well known, studies on the diversity of the endospore-forming and biosurfactant-producing bacterial genera/species in these habitats are underrepresented.

Methods: In this study, the structure of endospore-forming bacterial communities in sediment/mud samples from Vermelha Lagoon, Massambaba, Dois Rios and Abraão Beaches (saline environments), as well as the Praia Seca salterns (hypersaline environments) was determined via denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Bacterial strains were isolated from these environmental samples and further identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Strains presenting emulsification values higher than 30 % were grouped via BOX-PCR, and the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20 % NaCl to test their emulsifying activities in these extreme conditions. Mass spectrometry analysis was used to demonstrate the presence of surfactin.

Results: A diverse endospore-forming bacterial community was observed in all environments. The 110 bacterial strains isolated from these environmental samples were molecularly identified as belonging to the genera Bacillus, Thalassobacillus, Halobacillus, Paenibacillus, Fictibacillus and Paenisporosarcina. Fifty-two strains showed emulsification values of at least 30%, and they were grouped into 18 BOX groups. The stability of the emulsification values varied when the culture supernatants of representative strains were subjected to high temperatures and to the presence of up to 20% NaCl. The presence of surfactin was demonstrated in one of the most promising strains.

Conclusion: The environments studied can harbor endospore-forming bacteria capable of producing biosurfactants with biotechnological applications. Various endospore-forming bacterial genera/species are presented for the first time as biosurfactant producers.

No MeSH data available.