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The efficacy of neuromuscular electrical stimulation with alternating currents in the kilohertz frequency to stimulate gait rhythm in rats following spinal cord injury.

Kanchiku T, Suzuki H, Imajo Y, Yoshida Y, Moriya A, Suetomi Y, Nishida N, Takahashi Y, Taguchi T - Biomed Eng Online (2015)

Bottom Line: The needle electrodes were inserted percutaneously near the motor point of each muscle in conscious rats, and each muscle on the left and right leg was stimulated for 15 min at two frequencies, 75 Hz and 8 kHz, to induce a gait rhythm.There was no significant difference in BBB scores among the three groups.In 3D gait analysis, compared with the injury control group, the 8-kHz group showed a significant improvement in synergistic movement of both hindlimbs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, 755-8505, Japan. tkanchik@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rehabilitation facilitates the reorganization of residual/regenerated neural pathways and is key in improving motor function following spinal cord injury. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been reported as being clinically effective. Although it can be used after the acute phase post-injury, the optimal stimulation conditions to improve motor function remain unclear. In this paper, we examined the effectiveness of NMES with alternating currents in the kilohertz (kHz) frequency in gait rhythm stimulation therapy.

Methods: Tests were performed using 20 mature female Fischer rats. Incomplete spinal cord injuries (T9 level) were made with an IH impactor using a force of 150 kdyn, and NMES was administered for 3 days from the 7th day post-injury. The needle electrodes were inserted percutaneously near the motor point of each muscle in conscious rats, and each muscle on the left and right leg was stimulated for 15 min at two frequencies, 75 Hz and 8 kHz, to induce a gait rhythm. Motor function was evaluated using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis. Rats were divided into four groups (5 rats/group), including the NMES treatment 75-Hz group (iSCI-NMES 75 Hz), 8-kHz group (iSCI-NMES 8 kHz), injury control group (iSCI-NT), and normal group (Normal-CT), and were compared.

Results: There was no significant difference in BBB scores among the three groups. In 3D gait analysis, compared with the injury control group, the 8-kHz group showed a significant improvement in synergistic movement of both hindlimbs.

Conclusion: We suggest that kHz stimulation is effective in gait rhythm stimulation using NMES.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in mean leg range of motion over time. The changes in mean limb joint range of motion (ROM) immediately after the start of stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min later. a In the 75-Hz stimulation frequency group, good ROM is observed immediately after the start of stimulation; however, a significant decrease in ROM is observed 5 min later (p = 0.001). b In the 8-kHz stimulation frequency group, joint ROM is lower than that of the 75-Hz group immediately after stimulation, and then significantly decreases after 5 min
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Fig5: Changes in mean leg range of motion over time. The changes in mean limb joint range of motion (ROM) immediately after the start of stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min later. a In the 75-Hz stimulation frequency group, good ROM is observed immediately after the start of stimulation; however, a significant decrease in ROM is observed 5 min later (p = 0.001). b In the 8-kHz stimulation frequency group, joint ROM is lower than that of the 75-Hz group immediately after stimulation, and then significantly decreases after 5 min

Mentions: Figure 5 shows the average ankle joint ROM immediately after stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min post-stimulation. During the first 10 cycles of stimulation, the average observed ankle ROM of the iSCI-NMES 75-Hz group was 39°. After 5 min of NMES, the range decayed to 18 degrees, representing a significant decrease (Fig. 5a). The average observed ankle ROM of the iSCI-NMES 8-kHz group was 16 degrees. After 5 min of NMES, the range decayed to 6°, representing a significant decrease. The average ankle ROM of both groups remained greater than zero until the completion of the NMES session; however, significant decay continued at 10 and 15 min post-stimulation (Fig. 5b).Fig. 5


The efficacy of neuromuscular electrical stimulation with alternating currents in the kilohertz frequency to stimulate gait rhythm in rats following spinal cord injury.

Kanchiku T, Suzuki H, Imajo Y, Yoshida Y, Moriya A, Suetomi Y, Nishida N, Takahashi Y, Taguchi T - Biomed Eng Online (2015)

Changes in mean leg range of motion over time. The changes in mean limb joint range of motion (ROM) immediately after the start of stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min later. a In the 75-Hz stimulation frequency group, good ROM is observed immediately after the start of stimulation; however, a significant decrease in ROM is observed 5 min later (p = 0.001). b In the 8-kHz stimulation frequency group, joint ROM is lower than that of the 75-Hz group immediately after stimulation, and then significantly decreases after 5 min
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4625441&req=5

Fig5: Changes in mean leg range of motion over time. The changes in mean limb joint range of motion (ROM) immediately after the start of stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min later. a In the 75-Hz stimulation frequency group, good ROM is observed immediately after the start of stimulation; however, a significant decrease in ROM is observed 5 min later (p = 0.001). b In the 8-kHz stimulation frequency group, joint ROM is lower than that of the 75-Hz group immediately after stimulation, and then significantly decreases after 5 min
Mentions: Figure 5 shows the average ankle joint ROM immediately after stimulation and at 5, 10, and 15 min post-stimulation. During the first 10 cycles of stimulation, the average observed ankle ROM of the iSCI-NMES 75-Hz group was 39°. After 5 min of NMES, the range decayed to 18 degrees, representing a significant decrease (Fig. 5a). The average observed ankle ROM of the iSCI-NMES 8-kHz group was 16 degrees. After 5 min of NMES, the range decayed to 6°, representing a significant decrease. The average ankle ROM of both groups remained greater than zero until the completion of the NMES session; however, significant decay continued at 10 and 15 min post-stimulation (Fig. 5b).Fig. 5

Bottom Line: The needle electrodes were inserted percutaneously near the motor point of each muscle in conscious rats, and each muscle on the left and right leg was stimulated for 15 min at two frequencies, 75 Hz and 8 kHz, to induce a gait rhythm.There was no significant difference in BBB scores among the three groups.In 3D gait analysis, compared with the injury control group, the 8-kHz group showed a significant improvement in synergistic movement of both hindlimbs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Yamaguchi University Graduate School of Medicine, Ube, Yamaguchi, 755-8505, Japan. tkanchik@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Rehabilitation facilitates the reorganization of residual/regenerated neural pathways and is key in improving motor function following spinal cord injury. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been reported as being clinically effective. Although it can be used after the acute phase post-injury, the optimal stimulation conditions to improve motor function remain unclear. In this paper, we examined the effectiveness of NMES with alternating currents in the kilohertz (kHz) frequency in gait rhythm stimulation therapy.

Methods: Tests were performed using 20 mature female Fischer rats. Incomplete spinal cord injuries (T9 level) were made with an IH impactor using a force of 150 kdyn, and NMES was administered for 3 days from the 7th day post-injury. The needle electrodes were inserted percutaneously near the motor point of each muscle in conscious rats, and each muscle on the left and right leg was stimulated for 15 min at two frequencies, 75 Hz and 8 kHz, to induce a gait rhythm. Motor function was evaluated using Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) scores and three-dimensional (3D) gait analysis. Rats were divided into four groups (5 rats/group), including the NMES treatment 75-Hz group (iSCI-NMES 75 Hz), 8-kHz group (iSCI-NMES 8 kHz), injury control group (iSCI-NT), and normal group (Normal-CT), and were compared.

Results: There was no significant difference in BBB scores among the three groups. In 3D gait analysis, compared with the injury control group, the 8-kHz group showed a significant improvement in synergistic movement of both hindlimbs.

Conclusion: We suggest that kHz stimulation is effective in gait rhythm stimulation using NMES.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus