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Effects of exposure to facial expression variation in face learning and recognition.

Liu CH, Chen W, Ward J - Psychol Res (2014)

Bottom Line: We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2).However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3).The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Fern Barrow, Poole, BH12 5BB, UK. liuc@bournemouth.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Accuracy as a function of expression training and expression change in Experiment 2. Error bars represent one standard error above the means
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Fig3: Accuracy as a function of expression training and expression change in Experiment 2. Error bars represent one standard error above the means

Mentions: The d′ results of the recognition test are shown in Fig. 3. Faces trained in multiple expression (M = 2.39, SD = 1.11) and single expression (expression (M = 2.31, SD = 1.12) created comparable performance, F (1, 79) = 0.12, partial η2 ~ = 0.00, p = 0.73. Faces tested in the same expression (M = 3.03, SD = 1.03) as the training session created better performance than in a different expression (M = 1.66, SD = 1.18), F (1, 79) = 110.43, partial η2 = 0.58, p < 0.001. The interaction between these factors was not significant, F (1, 79) = 0.98, partial η2 = 0.01, p = 0.33.Fig. 3


Effects of exposure to facial expression variation in face learning and recognition.

Liu CH, Chen W, Ward J - Psychol Res (2014)

Accuracy as a function of expression training and expression change in Experiment 2. Error bars represent one standard error above the means
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4624836&req=5

Fig3: Accuracy as a function of expression training and expression change in Experiment 2. Error bars represent one standard error above the means
Mentions: The d′ results of the recognition test are shown in Fig. 3. Faces trained in multiple expression (M = 2.39, SD = 1.11) and single expression (expression (M = 2.31, SD = 1.12) created comparable performance, F (1, 79) = 0.12, partial η2 ~ = 0.00, p = 0.73. Faces tested in the same expression (M = 3.03, SD = 1.03) as the training session created better performance than in a different expression (M = 1.66, SD = 1.18), F (1, 79) = 110.43, partial η2 = 0.58, p < 0.001. The interaction between these factors was not significant, F (1, 79) = 0.98, partial η2 = 0.01, p = 0.33.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2).However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3).The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Bournemouth University, Talbot Campus, Fern Barrow, Poole, BH12 5BB, UK. liuc@bournemouth.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Facial expression is a major source of image variation in face images. Linking numerous expressions to the same face can be a huge challenge for face learning and recognition. It remains largely unknown what level of exposure to this image variation is critical for expression-invariant face recognition. We examined this issue in a recognition memory task, where the number of facial expressions of each face being exposed during a training session was manipulated. Faces were either trained with multiple expressions or a single expression, and they were later tested in either the same or different expressions. We found that recognition performance after learning three emotional expressions had no improvement over learning a single emotional expression (Experiments 1 and 2). However, learning three emotional expressions improved recognition compared to learning a single neutral expression (Experiment 3). These findings reveal both the limitation and the benefit of multiple exposures to variations of emotional expression in achieving expression-invariant face recognition. The transfer of expression training to a new type of expression is likely to depend on a relatively extensive level of training and a certain degree of variation across the types of expressions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus