Limits...
The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1.

de Vries KJ, Bagnaschi EA, Buchmueller O, Cavanaugh R, Citron M, De Roeck A, Dolan MJ, Ellis JR, Flächer H, Heinemeyer S, Isidori G, Malik S, Marrouche J, Santos DM, Olive KA, Sakurai K, Weiglein G - Eur Phys J C Part Fields (2015)

Bottom Line: We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of [Formula: see text], unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2.As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum [Formula: see text] with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a [Formula: see text] probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with [Formula: see text] in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2).We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, [Formula: see text] colliders and direct detection experiments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ UK.

ABSTRACT

We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale [Formula: see text]: the gaugino masses [Formula: see text], the first-and second-generation squark masses [Formula: see text], the third-generation squark mass [Formula: see text], a common slepton mass [Formula: see text] and a common trilinear mixing parameter A, as well as the Higgs mixing parameter [Formula: see text], the pseudoscalar Higgs mass [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with [Formula: see text]1.2 [Formula: see text] points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of [Formula: see text] by LHCb and CMS, other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino [Formula: see text]. We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of [Formula: see text], unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum [Formula: see text] with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a [Formula: see text] probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with [Formula: see text] in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses, and we show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the other models, e.g., the gluino may be as light as [Formula: see text]1250 [Formula: see text] at the 68 % CL, and squarks, stops, electroweak gauginos and sleptons may be much lighter than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, [Formula: see text] colliders and direct detection experiments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Left panel the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for  (black line), compared with the NUHM2, the NUHM1 and the CMSSM (solid, dashed and dotted blue lines, respectively). Right panel the two-dimensional profile likelihood function in the pMSSM in the -plane, showing the regions excluded by the XENON100 and LUX experiments (shaded green), the neutrino ‘floor’ (shaded yellow) and the prospective sensitivity of the LZ experiment (purple) [137]
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Fig21: Left panel the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for (black line), compared with the NUHM2, the NUHM1 and the CMSSM (solid, dashed and dotted blue lines, respectively). Right panel the two-dimensional profile likelihood function in the pMSSM in the -plane, showing the regions excluded by the XENON100 and LUX experiments (shaded green), the neutrino ‘floor’ (shaded yellow) and the prospective sensitivity of the LZ experiment (purple) [137]

Mentions: The left panel of Fig. 21 displays the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for with the same colour coding as in Fig. 13. We see that, in contrast to the other models, the pMSSM10 favours a low mass for the , driven again by the constraint. The right panel of Fig. 21 displays the two-dimensional profile likelihood for the lightest neutralino mass versus the spin-independent cross section, where the red and blue contours show the 68 and 95 % CL levels, respectively. The region that is excluded by LUX [92] and XENON100 [93] is shaded green, whereas the ‘floor’ below which the background from atmospheric neutrinos dominates is shaded yellow [137]. The low-mass vertical 95 % CL strips are due to points where the relic LSP density is brought into the cosmological range by annihilations through direct-channel Z and h poles.


The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1.

de Vries KJ, Bagnaschi EA, Buchmueller O, Cavanaugh R, Citron M, De Roeck A, Dolan MJ, Ellis JR, Flächer H, Heinemeyer S, Isidori G, Malik S, Marrouche J, Santos DM, Olive KA, Sakurai K, Weiglein G - Eur Phys J C Part Fields (2015)

Left panel the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for  (black line), compared with the NUHM2, the NUHM1 and the CMSSM (solid, dashed and dotted blue lines, respectively). Right panel the two-dimensional profile likelihood function in the pMSSM in the -plane, showing the regions excluded by the XENON100 and LUX experiments (shaded green), the neutrino ‘floor’ (shaded yellow) and the prospective sensitivity of the LZ experiment (purple) [137]
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4623934&req=5

Fig21: Left panel the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for (black line), compared with the NUHM2, the NUHM1 and the CMSSM (solid, dashed and dotted blue lines, respectively). Right panel the two-dimensional profile likelihood function in the pMSSM in the -plane, showing the regions excluded by the XENON100 and LUX experiments (shaded green), the neutrino ‘floor’ (shaded yellow) and the prospective sensitivity of the LZ experiment (purple) [137]
Mentions: The left panel of Fig. 21 displays the one-dimensional profile likelihood in the pMSSM10 for with the same colour coding as in Fig. 13. We see that, in contrast to the other models, the pMSSM10 favours a low mass for the , driven again by the constraint. The right panel of Fig. 21 displays the two-dimensional profile likelihood for the lightest neutralino mass versus the spin-independent cross section, where the red and blue contours show the 68 and 95 % CL levels, respectively. The region that is excluded by LUX [92] and XENON100 [93] is shaded green, whereas the ‘floor’ below which the background from atmospheric neutrinos dominates is shaded yellow [137]. The low-mass vertical 95 % CL strips are due to points where the relic LSP density is brought into the cosmological range by annihilations through direct-channel Z and h poles.

Bottom Line: We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of [Formula: see text], unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2.As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum [Formula: see text] with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a [Formula: see text] probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with [Formula: see text] in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2).We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, [Formula: see text] colliders and direct detection experiments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: High Energy Physics Group, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, Prince Consort Road, London, SW7 2AZ UK.

ABSTRACT

We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale [Formula: see text]: the gaugino masses [Formula: see text], the first-and second-generation squark masses [Formula: see text], the third-generation squark mass [Formula: see text], a common slepton mass [Formula: see text] and a common trilinear mixing parameter A, as well as the Higgs mixing parameter [Formula: see text], the pseudoscalar Higgs mass [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with [Formula: see text]1.2 [Formula: see text] points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons [Formula: see text][Formula: see text] signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of [Formula: see text] by LHCb and CMS, other B-physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino [Formula: see text]. We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of [Formula: see text], unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum [Formula: see text] with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a [Formula: see text] probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with [Formula: see text] in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We display the one-dimensional likelihood functions for sparticle masses, and we show that they may be significantly lighter in the pMSSM10 than in the other models, e.g., the gluino may be as light as [Formula: see text]1250 [Formula: see text] at the 68 % CL, and squarks, stops, electroweak gauginos and sleptons may be much lighter than in the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. We discuss the discovery potential of future LHC runs, [Formula: see text] colliders and direct detection experiments.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus