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Ebola in West Africa--CDC's Role in Epidemic Detection, Control, and Prevention.

Frieden TR, Damon IK - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: Efforts have included supporting incident management systems in affected countries; mobilizing partners; and strengthening laboratory, epidemiology, contact investigation, health care infection control, communication, and border screening in West Africa, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal, and the United States.All efforts were undertaken as part of national and global response activities with many partner organizations.CDC was able to support community, national, and international health and public health staff to prevent an even worse event.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Since Ebola virus disease was identified in West Africa on March 23, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has undertaken the most intensive response in the agency's history; >3,000 staff have been involved, including >1,200 deployed to West Africa for >50,000 person workdays. Efforts have included supporting incident management systems in affected countries; mobilizing partners; and strengthening laboratory, epidemiology, contact investigation, health care infection control, communication, and border screening in West Africa, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal, and the United States. All efforts were undertaken as part of national and global response activities with many partner organizations. CDC was able to support community, national, and international health and public health staff to prevent an even worse event. The Ebola virus disease epidemic highlights the need to strengthen national and international systems to detect, respond to, and prevent the spread of future health threats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of the estimated impact of interventions on number of Ebola cases with actual cases reported, Liberia, 2014–2015. The September 2014 modeled projection curve was based on Figure 3 in Meltzer et al. (22) by using model predictions calculated assuming that interventions started on September 24, 2014. The corrected curve of projected cases is adjusted for potential underreporting by multiplying reported cases by a factor of 2.5. Actual reported cases are from World Health Organization situation report for January 21, 2015 (26).
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Figure 4: Comparison of the estimated impact of interventions on number of Ebola cases with actual cases reported, Liberia, 2014–2015. The September 2014 modeled projection curve was based on Figure 3 in Meltzer et al. (22) by using model predictions calculated assuming that interventions started on September 24, 2014. The corrected curve of projected cases is adjusted for potential underreporting by multiplying reported cases by a factor of 2.5. Actual reported cases are from World Health Organization situation report for January 21, 2015 (26).

Mentions: Fourth, the model predicted that when the tipping point was reached, transmission would decline rapidly. This prediction was shown to be accurate in the following months in Liberia and Sierra Leone (Figure 3). For Liberia, the model’s prediction that if urgent action were taken, there would be 10,000–27,000 cumulative cases by January 21, 2015, closely matched the 8,500–24,000 cases that occurred (Figure 4). The predictions also closely matched the actual case trajectory after effective intervention.


Ebola in West Africa--CDC's Role in Epidemic Detection, Control, and Prevention.

Frieden TR, Damon IK - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Comparison of the estimated impact of interventions on number of Ebola cases with actual cases reported, Liberia, 2014–2015. The September 2014 modeled projection curve was based on Figure 3 in Meltzer et al. (22) by using model predictions calculated assuming that interventions started on September 24, 2014. The corrected curve of projected cases is adjusted for potential underreporting by multiplying reported cases by a factor of 2.5. Actual reported cases are from World Health Organization situation report for January 21, 2015 (26).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4622264&req=5

Figure 4: Comparison of the estimated impact of interventions on number of Ebola cases with actual cases reported, Liberia, 2014–2015. The September 2014 modeled projection curve was based on Figure 3 in Meltzer et al. (22) by using model predictions calculated assuming that interventions started on September 24, 2014. The corrected curve of projected cases is adjusted for potential underreporting by multiplying reported cases by a factor of 2.5. Actual reported cases are from World Health Organization situation report for January 21, 2015 (26).
Mentions: Fourth, the model predicted that when the tipping point was reached, transmission would decline rapidly. This prediction was shown to be accurate in the following months in Liberia and Sierra Leone (Figure 3). For Liberia, the model’s prediction that if urgent action were taken, there would be 10,000–27,000 cumulative cases by January 21, 2015, closely matched the 8,500–24,000 cases that occurred (Figure 4). The predictions also closely matched the actual case trajectory after effective intervention.

Bottom Line: Efforts have included supporting incident management systems in affected countries; mobilizing partners; and strengthening laboratory, epidemiology, contact investigation, health care infection control, communication, and border screening in West Africa, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal, and the United States.All efforts were undertaken as part of national and global response activities with many partner organizations.CDC was able to support community, national, and international health and public health staff to prevent an even worse event.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Since Ebola virus disease was identified in West Africa on March 23, 2014, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has undertaken the most intensive response in the agency's history; >3,000 staff have been involved, including >1,200 deployed to West Africa for >50,000 person workdays. Efforts have included supporting incident management systems in affected countries; mobilizing partners; and strengthening laboratory, epidemiology, contact investigation, health care infection control, communication, and border screening in West Africa, Nigeria, Mali, Senegal, and the United States. All efforts were undertaken as part of national and global response activities with many partner organizations. CDC was able to support community, national, and international health and public health staff to prevent an even worse event. The Ebola virus disease epidemic highlights the need to strengthen national and international systems to detect, respond to, and prevent the spread of future health threats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus