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Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

Fok A, Mateevici C, Lin B, Chandra RV, Chong VH - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis.This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Frontal chest radiograph of a 47-year-old man with encephalitis-associated human metapneumovirus, Australia. Consolidation in the right middle lobe (circle) is compatible with pneumonia.
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Figure 1: Frontal chest radiograph of a 47-year-old man with encephalitis-associated human metapneumovirus, Australia. Consolidation in the right middle lobe (circle) is compatible with pneumonia.

Mentions: During the winter months of 2014 a 47-year-old man was found unconscious by his family at his home in Victoria, Australia. He had a 2-day history of upper respiratory tract symptoms (cough, dyspnea, rhinorrhea, myalgia, and headache). He had not traveled overseas recently. Emergency services personnel determined he had a Glasgow coma scale score of 10; in the emergency department, he was intubated when his Glasgow coma scale score dropped to 8. Examination showed blood pressure of 135/83 mm Hg, heart rate of 105 beats/min, and temperature of 37.2°C. He had no cranial nerve palsies; limb examination showed normal tone and reflexes; and he was moving all 4 limbs. He had mild neutrophilia (8.2 × 109 cells/L [reference range 2.0–8.0]), mild lymphopenia (0.9 × 109 cells/L [reference range 1.0–4.0]), and elevated C-reactive protein (30 mg/L [reference range <5]). Electrolytes, liver function, coagulation screen, thyroid function, ammonia, creatinine kinase, ethanol level, and paracetamol level were normal. Electrocardiogram demonstrated sinus tachycardia, and chest radiograph showed right basal pneumonia (Figure 1). At day 0, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed glucose 4.2 mmol/L (reference range 2.0–3.9), protein 0.77 g/L (reference range 0.15–0.45), erythrocytes 43 × 106 cells/L, and no leukocytes. Gram stain and culture were negative for microorganisms.


Encephalitis-Associated Human Metapneumovirus Pneumonia in Adult, Australia.

Fok A, Mateevici C, Lin B, Chandra RV, Chong VH - Emerging Infect. Dis. (2015)

Frontal chest radiograph of a 47-year-old man with encephalitis-associated human metapneumovirus, Australia. Consolidation in the right middle lobe (circle) is compatible with pneumonia.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4622250&req=5

Figure 1: Frontal chest radiograph of a 47-year-old man with encephalitis-associated human metapneumovirus, Australia. Consolidation in the right middle lobe (circle) is compatible with pneumonia.
Mentions: During the winter months of 2014 a 47-year-old man was found unconscious by his family at his home in Victoria, Australia. He had a 2-day history of upper respiratory tract symptoms (cough, dyspnea, rhinorrhea, myalgia, and headache). He had not traveled overseas recently. Emergency services personnel determined he had a Glasgow coma scale score of 10; in the emergency department, he was intubated when his Glasgow coma scale score dropped to 8. Examination showed blood pressure of 135/83 mm Hg, heart rate of 105 beats/min, and temperature of 37.2°C. He had no cranial nerve palsies; limb examination showed normal tone and reflexes; and he was moving all 4 limbs. He had mild neutrophilia (8.2 × 109 cells/L [reference range 2.0–8.0]), mild lymphopenia (0.9 × 109 cells/L [reference range 1.0–4.0]), and elevated C-reactive protein (30 mg/L [reference range <5]). Electrolytes, liver function, coagulation screen, thyroid function, ammonia, creatinine kinase, ethanol level, and paracetamol level were normal. Electrocardiogram demonstrated sinus tachycardia, and chest radiograph showed right basal pneumonia (Figure 1). At day 0, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) showed glucose 4.2 mmol/L (reference range 2.0–3.9), protein 0.77 g/L (reference range 0.15–0.45), erythrocytes 43 × 106 cells/L, and no leukocytes. Gram stain and culture were negative for microorganisms.

Bottom Line: Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis.This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT
Human metapneumovirus pneumonia, most commonly found in children, was diagnosed in an adult with encephalitis. This case suggests that testing for human metapneumovirus RNA in nasopharyngeal aspirate and cerebrospinal fluid samples should be considered in adults with encephalitis who have a preceding respiratory infection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus