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Increases in both temperature means and extremes likely facilitate invasive herbivore outbreaks.

Ju RT, Zhu HY, Gao L, Zhou XH, Li B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata.The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations.The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Fudan University, 2005 Songhu Road, Shanghai 200438, China.

ABSTRACT
Although increases in mean temperature (MT) and extreme high temperature (EHT) can greatly affect population dynamics of insects under global warming, how concurrent changes in both MT and EHT affect invasive species is largely unknown. We used four thermal regimes to simulate the increases in summer temperature and compared their effects on the life-history traits of three geographical populations (Chongqing, Wuhan and Shanghai) of an invasive insect, Corythucha ciliata, in China. The four thermal regimes were control (i.e., natural or ambient), an increase in MT (IMT), an increase in EHT, and a combination of IMT + EHT. We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata. Consequently, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) was enhanced and the number of days required for population doubling (t) was reduced by the warming regimes. The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations. These results indicate that population size of C. ciliata may be enhanced by increases in both temperature means and extremes. The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

No MeSH data available.


Mean temperatures (a) and number of days in which the daily maximum temperatures were ≥37 °C (b) in July-August at Shanghai from 1954 to 2013.Data were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System (http://cdc.cma.gov.cn). The weather stations providing these data are located in Longhua, Shanghai (31.10 °N, 121.26 °E).
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f5: Mean temperatures (a) and number of days in which the daily maximum temperatures were ≥37 °C (b) in July-August at Shanghai from 1954 to 2013.Data were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System (http://cdc.cma.gov.cn). The weather stations providing these data are located in Longhua, Shanghai (31.10 °N, 121.26 °E).

Mentions: Based on the effects of global warming on insects123151, predicting an insect’s population dynamics requires an understanding of how the insect responds to thermal conditions. We previously found that C. ciliata could survive at heat-shock temperatures as high as 40 °C for 2 h before they were transferred to a constant temperature of 26 °C29. In the present study, we further found that increasing the current diurnal temperature cycle of summer by 2 °C in the IMT regime, increasing the peak temperature to 38 °C for 2 h in the EHT regime, or combining these two regimes enhanced the population growth of C. ciliata. Given current temperatures and climate change in the Yangtze Basin30, for example in Shanghai, MTs in summer have steadily increased over the last 60 years (Fig. 5a), while the number of hot days on which the daily maximum temperature was greater than 37 °C was 12.5-times greater for the most recent 10-year period than for the 10-year period of 1954–1963 (Fig. 5b). Hot summers in recent years, therefore, might have contributed to population outbreaks of C. ciliata in the Yangtze Basin, where severer outbreaks of the invasive pest will likely occur in the future due to more hot-summers caused by climate warming.


Increases in both temperature means and extremes likely facilitate invasive herbivore outbreaks.

Ju RT, Zhu HY, Gao L, Zhou XH, Li B - Sci Rep (2015)

Mean temperatures (a) and number of days in which the daily maximum temperatures were ≥37 °C (b) in July-August at Shanghai from 1954 to 2013.Data were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System (http://cdc.cma.gov.cn). The weather stations providing these data are located in Longhua, Shanghai (31.10 °N, 121.26 °E).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4622076&req=5

f5: Mean temperatures (a) and number of days in which the daily maximum temperatures were ≥37 °C (b) in July-August at Shanghai from 1954 to 2013.Data were obtained from the China Meteorological Data Sharing Service System (http://cdc.cma.gov.cn). The weather stations providing these data are located in Longhua, Shanghai (31.10 °N, 121.26 °E).
Mentions: Based on the effects of global warming on insects123151, predicting an insect’s population dynamics requires an understanding of how the insect responds to thermal conditions. We previously found that C. ciliata could survive at heat-shock temperatures as high as 40 °C for 2 h before they were transferred to a constant temperature of 26 °C29. In the present study, we further found that increasing the current diurnal temperature cycle of summer by 2 °C in the IMT regime, increasing the peak temperature to 38 °C for 2 h in the EHT regime, or combining these two regimes enhanced the population growth of C. ciliata. Given current temperatures and climate change in the Yangtze Basin30, for example in Shanghai, MTs in summer have steadily increased over the last 60 years (Fig. 5a), while the number of hot days on which the daily maximum temperature was greater than 37 °C was 12.5-times greater for the most recent 10-year period than for the 10-year period of 1954–1963 (Fig. 5b). Hot summers in recent years, therefore, might have contributed to population outbreaks of C. ciliata in the Yangtze Basin, where severer outbreaks of the invasive pest will likely occur in the future due to more hot-summers caused by climate warming.

Bottom Line: We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata.The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations.The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ministry of Education Key Laboratory for Biodiversity Science and Ecological Engineering, Fudan University, 2005 Songhu Road, Shanghai 200438, China.

ABSTRACT
Although increases in mean temperature (MT) and extreme high temperature (EHT) can greatly affect population dynamics of insects under global warming, how concurrent changes in both MT and EHT affect invasive species is largely unknown. We used four thermal regimes to simulate the increases in summer temperature and compared their effects on the life-history traits of three geographical populations (Chongqing, Wuhan and Shanghai) of an invasive insect, Corythucha ciliata, in China. The four thermal regimes were control (i.e., natural or ambient), an increase in MT (IMT), an increase in EHT, and a combination of IMT + EHT. We found that the three warming regimes significantly increased the developmental rate but did not affect the survival, sex ratio, longevity, or fecundity of C. ciliata. Consequently, the intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm) was enhanced and the number of days required for population doubling (t) was reduced by the warming regimes. The demographic parameters did not significantly differ among the three populations. These results indicate that population size of C. ciliata may be enhanced by increases in both temperature means and extremes. The increases in summer temperature associated with climate change, therefore, would likely facilitate population outbreaks of some thermophilic invasive insects.

No MeSH data available.