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Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study.

Conti PC, Corrêa AS, Lauris JR, Stuginski-Barbosa J - J Appl Oral Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes.The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly.Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR.Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device's design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Bauru, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia.Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey's and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%.Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly.Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device's design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking sounds for the three groups at different times. For each subject, two TMJs were considered (n=120)
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f03: Presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking sounds for the three groups at different times. For each subject, two TMJs were considered (n=120)

Mentions: In the beginning of the study, all patients had a TMJ click at least in one side. When joint sounds (clicking) were investigated after 3 months, a decrease in frequency for groups I and III was observed. On the other hand, an increase in frequency for those in group II (Figure 3) was detected, although with no significance.


Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study.

Conti PC, Corrêa AS, Lauris JR, Stuginski-Barbosa J - J Appl Oral Sci (2015)

Presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking sounds for the three groups at different times. For each subject, two TMJs were considered (n=120)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4621948&req=5

f03: Presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking sounds for the three groups at different times. For each subject, two TMJs were considered (n=120)
Mentions: In the beginning of the study, all patients had a TMJ click at least in one side. When joint sounds (clicking) were investigated after 3 months, a decrease in frequency for groups I and III was observed. On the other hand, an increase in frequency for those in group II (Figure 3) was detected, although with no significance.

Bottom Line: Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes.The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly.Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR.Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device's design.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Prosthodontics, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Bauru, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia.Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey's and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%.Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly.Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device's design.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus