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Selective vulnerability of Rich Club brain regions is an organizational principle of structural connectivity loss in Huntington's disease.

McColgan P, Seunarine KK, Razi A, Cole JH, Gregory S, Durr A, Roos RA, Stout JC, Landwehrmeyer B, Scahill RI, Clark CA, Rees G, Tabrizi SJ, Track-HD Investigato - Brain (2015)

Bottom Line: By understanding such principles we can gain insight into the link between the cellular pathology caused by mutant huntingtin and its downstream effect at the macroscopic level.We also observed greater reductions in the connectivity of brain regions that have higher network traffic and lower clustering of neighbouring regions.This provides a potential mechanism that results in a characteristic pattern of structural connectivity loss targeting highly connected brain regions with high network traffic and low clustering of neighbouring regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, UK s.tabrizi@ucl.ac.uk g.rees@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Network-based statistics analysis showing significantly reduced connectivity between premanifest Huntington’s disease versus controls in cortico-caudate connections. Red = caudate; blue = cortical rich club regions; yellow = cortico-caudate connections.
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awv259-F4: Network-based statistics analysis showing significantly reduced connectivity between premanifest Huntington’s disease versus controls in cortico-caudate connections. Red = caudate; blue = cortical rich club regions; yellow = cortico-caudate connections.

Mentions: When comparing premanifest Huntington’s disease participants versus control subjects significant reductions were predominantly seen in cortico-caudate connections in the network-based statistics analysis (Fig. 4). These included a number of basal ganglia connections to cortical rich club and non-rich club regions (Supplementary Table 4).Figure 4


Selective vulnerability of Rich Club brain regions is an organizational principle of structural connectivity loss in Huntington's disease.

McColgan P, Seunarine KK, Razi A, Cole JH, Gregory S, Durr A, Roos RA, Stout JC, Landwehrmeyer B, Scahill RI, Clark CA, Rees G, Tabrizi SJ, Track-HD Investigato - Brain (2015)

Network-based statistics analysis showing significantly reduced connectivity between premanifest Huntington’s disease versus controls in cortico-caudate connections. Red = caudate; blue = cortical rich club regions; yellow = cortico-caudate connections.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4620513&req=5

awv259-F4: Network-based statistics analysis showing significantly reduced connectivity between premanifest Huntington’s disease versus controls in cortico-caudate connections. Red = caudate; blue = cortical rich club regions; yellow = cortico-caudate connections.
Mentions: When comparing premanifest Huntington’s disease participants versus control subjects significant reductions were predominantly seen in cortico-caudate connections in the network-based statistics analysis (Fig. 4). These included a number of basal ganglia connections to cortical rich club and non-rich club regions (Supplementary Table 4).Figure 4

Bottom Line: By understanding such principles we can gain insight into the link between the cellular pathology caused by mutant huntingtin and its downstream effect at the macroscopic level.We also observed greater reductions in the connectivity of brain regions that have higher network traffic and lower clustering of neighbouring regions.This provides a potential mechanism that results in a characteristic pattern of structural connectivity loss targeting highly connected brain regions with high network traffic and low clustering of neighbouring regions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1 Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, UK s.tabrizi@ucl.ac.uk g.rees@ucl.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus