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Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe.

Mkhitaryan VV, Jelezko F, Dobrovitski VV - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength.Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10-100 in comparison with the existing detection methods.Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ames Laboratory US DOE, Ames, Iowa, 50011, USA.

ABSTRACT
We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10-100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. The method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

No MeSH data available.


(a) Rotary echo signal after N = 100 cycles, as a function of the switching time T for a NV spin coupled to 14 13C nuclear spins, randomly placed in the diamond lattice with natural abundance, for ωL = 2π · 428 kHz. Driving h is adjusted so that hT = 28π (so that 4.59 ≤ (h/2π) ≤ 5.28 MHz). The region corresponding to the resonances of the order k = 3 is shown. Theoretically expected resonances are marked with green lines; each of the lines marked with arrows correspond to a pair of nuclei located at the symmetry-related sites, and having almost the same value of . Parameters of the nuclear spins are given in Supplementary Information. (b–e) Magnified view of the different areas of the panel (a).
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f3: (a) Rotary echo signal after N = 100 cycles, as a function of the switching time T for a NV spin coupled to 14 13C nuclear spins, randomly placed in the diamond lattice with natural abundance, for ωL = 2π · 428 kHz. Driving h is adjusted so that hT = 28π (so that 4.59 ≤ (h/2π) ≤ 5.28 MHz). The region corresponding to the resonances of the order k = 3 is shown. Theoretically expected resonances are marked with green lines; each of the lines marked with arrows correspond to a pair of nuclei located at the symmetry-related sites, and having almost the same value of . Parameters of the nuclear spins are given in Supplementary Information. (b–e) Magnified view of the different areas of the panel (a).

Mentions: To test our approach, and to illustrate its performance under realistic circumstances, we performed direct simulations of the rotary-echo detection for the NV center coupled to 14 nuclear spins of 13C randomly located in diamond lattice. The simulation results, given in Fig. 3 for k = 3, clearly show the sharp, well-resolved peaks, corresponding to different nuclei, with selectivity in sub-kHz region, even for very modest driving h ~ 2π · 5 MHz (see also Supplementary Information for more details). Some nuclei, located at the symmetry-related positions in the lattice, have the same and hence the same resonance value of T; to resolve them, the static bias field should be tilted away from the symmetry axis of the NV center6. The simulations also confirm our conclusion (see Supplementary Information) that the NV-mediated interaction between the nuclear spins, caused by the driving, does not noticeably affect the detection efficiency.


Highly selective detection of individual nuclear spins with rotary echo on an electron spin probe.

Mkhitaryan VV, Jelezko F, Dobrovitski VV - Sci Rep (2015)

(a) Rotary echo signal after N = 100 cycles, as a function of the switching time T for a NV spin coupled to 14 13C nuclear spins, randomly placed in the diamond lattice with natural abundance, for ωL = 2π · 428 kHz. Driving h is adjusted so that hT = 28π (so that 4.59 ≤ (h/2π) ≤ 5.28 MHz). The region corresponding to the resonances of the order k = 3 is shown. Theoretically expected resonances are marked with green lines; each of the lines marked with arrows correspond to a pair of nuclei located at the symmetry-related sites, and having almost the same value of . Parameters of the nuclear spins are given in Supplementary Information. (b–e) Magnified view of the different areas of the panel (a).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4620492&req=5

f3: (a) Rotary echo signal after N = 100 cycles, as a function of the switching time T for a NV spin coupled to 14 13C nuclear spins, randomly placed in the diamond lattice with natural abundance, for ωL = 2π · 428 kHz. Driving h is adjusted so that hT = 28π (so that 4.59 ≤ (h/2π) ≤ 5.28 MHz). The region corresponding to the resonances of the order k = 3 is shown. Theoretically expected resonances are marked with green lines; each of the lines marked with arrows correspond to a pair of nuclei located at the symmetry-related sites, and having almost the same value of . Parameters of the nuclear spins are given in Supplementary Information. (b–e) Magnified view of the different areas of the panel (a).
Mentions: To test our approach, and to illustrate its performance under realistic circumstances, we performed direct simulations of the rotary-echo detection for the NV center coupled to 14 nuclear spins of 13C randomly located in diamond lattice. The simulation results, given in Fig. 3 for k = 3, clearly show the sharp, well-resolved peaks, corresponding to different nuclei, with selectivity in sub-kHz region, even for very modest driving h ~ 2π · 5 MHz (see also Supplementary Information for more details). Some nuclei, located at the symmetry-related positions in the lattice, have the same and hence the same resonance value of T; to resolve them, the static bias field should be tilted away from the symmetry axis of the NV center6. The simulations also confirm our conclusion (see Supplementary Information) that the NV-mediated interaction between the nuclear spins, caused by the driving, does not noticeably affect the detection efficiency.

Bottom Line: The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength.Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10-100 in comparison with the existing detection methods.Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Ames Laboratory US DOE, Ames, Iowa, 50011, USA.

ABSTRACT
We consider an electronic spin, such as a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, weakly coupled to a large number of nuclear spins, and subjected to the Rabi driving with a periodically alternating phase. We show that by switching the driving phase synchronously with the precession of a given nuclear spin, the interaction to this spin is selectively enhanced, while the rest of the bath remains decoupled. The enhancement is of resonant character. The key feature of the suggested scheme is that the width of the resonance is adjustable, and can be greatly decreased by increasing the driving strength. Thus, the resonance can be significantly narrowed, by a factor of 10-100 in comparison with the existing detection methods. Significant improvement in selectivity is explained analytically and confirmed by direct numerical many-spin simulations. The method can be applied to a wide range of solid-state systems.

No MeSH data available.