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Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient.

Kohlberg GD, Mancuso DM, Chari DA, Lalwani AK - Behav Neurol (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1-3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation.Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners.Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Columbia University Cochlear Implant Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, Harkness Pavilion 8th Floor, New York, NY 10032, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI) listener.

Methods: Normal hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9) evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less complex, versions created by including subsets of the musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation processing.

Results: Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1-3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation. Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners.

Conclusions: Reengineering a piece of music to reduce its complexity has the potential to enhance music enjoyment for the cochlear implantee. Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

No MeSH data available.


NH listeners with CI simulation enjoyment by number of instruments. NH listeners preferred modified segments comprised of a single instrument, two instruments, or three instruments compared to the original music sample. P: pleasant, N: natural, M: sounds like music, and Inst: instruments. Center lines show the medians, box limits indicate the 25th and 75th percentiles, whiskers extend to 5th and 95th percentiles, outliers are represented by dots, and crosses represent sample means.
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fig2: NH listeners with CI simulation enjoyment by number of instruments. NH listeners preferred modified segments comprised of a single instrument, two instruments, or three instruments compared to the original music sample. P: pleasant, N: natural, M: sounds like music, and Inst: instruments. Center lines show the medians, box limits indicate the 25th and 75th percentiles, whiskers extend to 5th and 95th percentiles, outliers are represented by dots, and crosses represent sample means.

Mentions: When listening with CI simulation, NH listeners rated the original music segment less enjoyable than modified versions comprised of one to three musical elements (Figure 2). Compared to the original music sample, modified versions with a single instrument were significantly more pleasant by 59.5% (P < 0.05). The relative increase in enjoyment for the modified versions with 1–3 instruments compared to the original song for NH listeners with CI simulation is summarized in Table 2. A linear regression analysis of enjoyment with ANOVA found a significant difference in the means for the original version and for modified versions with 1–3 instruments on the pleasant scale (P = 0.001) and natural scale (P = 0.003) but not the musical scale (P = 0.09).


Music Engineering as a Novel Strategy for Enhancing Music Enjoyment in the Cochlear Implant Recipient.

Kohlberg GD, Mancuso DM, Chari DA, Lalwani AK - Behav Neurol (2015)

NH listeners with CI simulation enjoyment by number of instruments. NH listeners preferred modified segments comprised of a single instrument, two instruments, or three instruments compared to the original music sample. P: pleasant, N: natural, M: sounds like music, and Inst: instruments. Center lines show the medians, box limits indicate the 25th and 75th percentiles, whiskers extend to 5th and 95th percentiles, outliers are represented by dots, and crosses represent sample means.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4620405&req=5

fig2: NH listeners with CI simulation enjoyment by number of instruments. NH listeners preferred modified segments comprised of a single instrument, two instruments, or three instruments compared to the original music sample. P: pleasant, N: natural, M: sounds like music, and Inst: instruments. Center lines show the medians, box limits indicate the 25th and 75th percentiles, whiskers extend to 5th and 95th percentiles, outliers are represented by dots, and crosses represent sample means.
Mentions: When listening with CI simulation, NH listeners rated the original music segment less enjoyable than modified versions comprised of one to three musical elements (Figure 2). Compared to the original music sample, modified versions with a single instrument were significantly more pleasant by 59.5% (P < 0.05). The relative increase in enjoyment for the modified versions with 1–3 instruments compared to the original song for NH listeners with CI simulation is summarized in Table 2. A linear regression analysis of enjoyment with ANOVA found a significant difference in the means for the original version and for modified versions with 1–3 instruments on the pleasant scale (P = 0.001) and natural scale (P = 0.003) but not the musical scale (P = 0.09).

Bottom Line: Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1-3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation.Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners.Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Columbia University Cochlear Implant Center, Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, 180 Fort Washington Avenue, Harkness Pavilion 8th Floor, New York, NY 10032, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Enjoyment of music remains an elusive goal following cochlear implantation. We test the hypothesis that reengineering music to reduce its complexity can enhance the listening experience for the cochlear implant (CI) listener.

Methods: Normal hearing (NH) adults (N = 16) and CI listeners (N = 9) evaluated a piece of country music on three enjoyment modalities: pleasantness, musicality, and naturalness. Participants listened to the original version along with 20 modified, less complex, versions created by including subsets of the musical instruments from the original song. NH participants listened to the segments both with and without CI simulation processing.

Results: Compared to the original song, modified versions containing only 1-3 instruments were less enjoyable to the NH listeners but more enjoyable to the CI listeners and the NH listeners with CI simulation. Excluding vocals and including rhythmic instruments improved enjoyment for NH listeners with CI simulation but made no difference for CI listeners.

Conclusions: Reengineering a piece of music to reduce its complexity has the potential to enhance music enjoyment for the cochlear implantee. Thus, in addition to improvements in software and hardware, engineering music specifically for the CI listener may be an alternative means to enhance their listening experience.

No MeSH data available.