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Central line complications.

Kornbau C, Lee KC, Hughes GD, Firstenberg MS - Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci (2015 Jul-Sep)

Bottom Line: Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access.These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life.This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Summa Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio, United States.

ABSTRACT
Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ipsilateral pneumothorax. Pneumothorax following left-sided subclavian line placement
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Figure 4: Ipsilateral pneumothorax. Pneumothorax following left-sided subclavian line placement

Mentions: Pulmonary complications that can occur during catheter placement include pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, chylothorax, tracheal injury, injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and air embolus. Injury to the parietal pleura during central line placement results in pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum occur in up to 1% of cases and are most often related to subclavian catheter placement.[1510] Risk factors for pneumothorax are larger catheter size and number of attempted insertions. Pneumothorax can be detected using bedside ultrasound at the time of insertion, but can also be detected on post-insertion upright chest X-ray or CT [Figures 3 and 4].[3] If the pneumothorax is less than <15% in size, it can be managed conservatively with high flow oxygen and close observation. Hemodynamic instability and hypoxia obviate the need for emergent chest tube placement.[10]


Central line complications.

Kornbau C, Lee KC, Hughes GD, Firstenberg MS - Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci (2015 Jul-Sep)

Ipsilateral pneumothorax. Pneumothorax following left-sided subclavian line placement
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4613416&req=5

Figure 4: Ipsilateral pneumothorax. Pneumothorax following left-sided subclavian line placement
Mentions: Pulmonary complications that can occur during catheter placement include pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, chylothorax, tracheal injury, injury to the recurrent laryngeal nerve, and air embolus. Injury to the parietal pleura during central line placement results in pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum. Pneumothorax and pneumomediastinum occur in up to 1% of cases and are most often related to subclavian catheter placement.[1510] Risk factors for pneumothorax are larger catheter size and number of attempted insertions. Pneumothorax can be detected using bedside ultrasound at the time of insertion, but can also be detected on post-insertion upright chest X-ray or CT [Figures 3 and 4].[3] If the pneumothorax is less than <15% in size, it can be managed conservatively with high flow oxygen and close observation. Hemodynamic instability and hypoxia obviate the need for emergent chest tube placement.[10]

Bottom Line: Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access.These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life.This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Surgery, Summa Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio, United States.

ABSTRACT
Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus