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Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems--Synthesis, Standardization and Analysis Methods in the NanoMag Project.

Bogren S, Fornara A, Ludwig F, Del Puerto Morales M, Steinhoff U, Hansen MF, Kazakova O, Johansson C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes.The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering.The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls Backe 4, Box 53071, SE-400 14 Göteborg, Sweden. sara.bogren@acreo.se.

ABSTRACT
This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic pictures of magnetic (a) multi-core particles and (b) single-core particles. The definitions of the size parameters of the two different particle types are also shown in the figure. See the text for an explanation of the compartments.
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ijms-16-20308-f003: Schematic pictures of magnetic (a) multi-core particles and (b) single-core particles. The definitions of the size parameters of the two different particle types are also shown in the figure. See the text for an explanation of the compartments.

Mentions: Since the behaviour of MNPs in a suspension crucially depends on their physical properties (for instance, the mean size and the distribution of sizes of both the nanocrystals and the physical particles as well as the hydrodynamic size and surface charge that determine the colloidal stability) and the type of MNP systems (single- or multi-core particle system), it is of vital importance for different biomedical applications that the analysis methods used to determine the physical parameters are well defined and standardized. In the description of the structural composition of a typical iron oxide based MNP suspension, there should be a clear distinction between the different compartments of the suspension: metal oxide cores, organic coating and suspension medium (see Figure 3). A single-core magnetic nanoparticle can be defined as a particle containing only a single nanocrystal that can be further coated and functionalized at the surface for colloidal stability and also for use in specific applications (e.g., specific binding to different analytes). A multi-core particle can be defined as a particle containing several nanocrystals either densely or loosely packed within the multi-core structure. The surface of the multi-core particle can also be coated and functionalized. We have earlier presented a review of synthesis of single-core and multi-core particles [4]. The magnetic properties of single-core and multi-core particles depend on both the properties of the nanocrystals (such as their size distribution) and in the case of multi-core particles how the nanocrystals are distributed in the multi-core structure [5,6]. Schematic pictures of single- and multi-core particles are shown in Figure 3.


Classification of Magnetic Nanoparticle Systems--Synthesis, Standardization and Analysis Methods in the NanoMag Project.

Bogren S, Fornara A, Ludwig F, Del Puerto Morales M, Steinhoff U, Hansen MF, Kazakova O, Johansson C - Int J Mol Sci (2015)

Schematic pictures of magnetic (a) multi-core particles and (b) single-core particles. The definitions of the size parameters of the two different particle types are also shown in the figure. See the text for an explanation of the compartments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4613205&req=5

ijms-16-20308-f003: Schematic pictures of magnetic (a) multi-core particles and (b) single-core particles. The definitions of the size parameters of the two different particle types are also shown in the figure. See the text for an explanation of the compartments.
Mentions: Since the behaviour of MNPs in a suspension crucially depends on their physical properties (for instance, the mean size and the distribution of sizes of both the nanocrystals and the physical particles as well as the hydrodynamic size and surface charge that determine the colloidal stability) and the type of MNP systems (single- or multi-core particle system), it is of vital importance for different biomedical applications that the analysis methods used to determine the physical parameters are well defined and standardized. In the description of the structural composition of a typical iron oxide based MNP suspension, there should be a clear distinction between the different compartments of the suspension: metal oxide cores, organic coating and suspension medium (see Figure 3). A single-core magnetic nanoparticle can be defined as a particle containing only a single nanocrystal that can be further coated and functionalized at the surface for colloidal stability and also for use in specific applications (e.g., specific binding to different analytes). A multi-core particle can be defined as a particle containing several nanocrystals either densely or loosely packed within the multi-core structure. The surface of the multi-core particle can also be coated and functionalized. We have earlier presented a review of synthesis of single-core and multi-core particles [4]. The magnetic properties of single-core and multi-core particles depend on both the properties of the nanocrystals (such as their size distribution) and in the case of multi-core particles how the nanocrystals are distributed in the multi-core structure [5,6]. Schematic pictures of single- and multi-core particles are shown in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes.The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering.The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls Backe 4, Box 53071, SE-400 14 Göteborg, Sweden. sara.bogren@acreo.se.

ABSTRACT
This study presents classification of different magnetic single- and multi-core particle systems using their measured dynamic magnetic properties together with their nanocrystal and particle sizes. The dynamic magnetic properties are measured with AC (dynamical) susceptometry and magnetorelaxometry and the size parameters are determined from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Using these methods, we also show that the nanocrystal size and particle morphology determines the dynamic magnetic properties for both single- and multi-core particles. The presented results are obtained from the four year EU NMP FP7 project, NanoMag, which is focused on standardization of analysis methods for magnetic nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus