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Peritoneal Mesothelioma: An Unusual Cause of High-Protein Ascites.

Kaspar M - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Bottom Line: We present a case illustrating the workup and diagnosis of peritoneal sarcomatous mesothelioma as an unusual etiology of intestinal obstruction and high-protein ascites in an otherwise healthy man.In many cases, localized disease can be treated to cure with surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy.Advanced disease is often treated for palliation of symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA.

ABSTRACT
We present a case illustrating the workup and diagnosis of peritoneal sarcomatous mesothelioma as an unusual etiology of intestinal obstruction and high-protein ascites in an otherwise healthy man. This rare disorder is diagnosed based on immunohistochemistry, which is necessary to differentiate it from other rare sarcomatous carcinomas. In many cases, localized disease can be treated to cure with surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Advanced disease is often treated for palliation of symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Upper GI series showing small bowel follow-through with a long length of small bowel luminal narrowing and fold thickening.
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Figure 1: Upper GI series showing small bowel follow-through with a long length of small bowel luminal narrowing and fold thickening.

Mentions: Over the next 7 days, the patient's abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation progressed to a clinical picture consistent with small bowel obstruction. A nasogastric tube was placed with improvement in patient's nausea and pain. Upper GI series did not reveal obstruction, but showed slow transit time with a long length of luminal narrowing and irregularities in the distal small bowel, concerning for a serosal process such as infection, neoplasm, or carcinomatosis (Figure 1).


Peritoneal Mesothelioma: An Unusual Cause of High-Protein Ascites.

Kaspar M - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Upper GI series showing small bowel follow-through with a long length of small bowel luminal narrowing and fold thickening.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612766&req=5

Figure 1: Upper GI series showing small bowel follow-through with a long length of small bowel luminal narrowing and fold thickening.
Mentions: Over the next 7 days, the patient's abdominal pain, vomiting, and constipation progressed to a clinical picture consistent with small bowel obstruction. A nasogastric tube was placed with improvement in patient's nausea and pain. Upper GI series did not reveal obstruction, but showed slow transit time with a long length of luminal narrowing and irregularities in the distal small bowel, concerning for a serosal process such as infection, neoplasm, or carcinomatosis (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: We present a case illustrating the workup and diagnosis of peritoneal sarcomatous mesothelioma as an unusual etiology of intestinal obstruction and high-protein ascites in an otherwise healthy man.In many cases, localized disease can be treated to cure with surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy.Advanced disease is often treated for palliation of symptoms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University Medical Center, Richmond, VA.

ABSTRACT
We present a case illustrating the workup and diagnosis of peritoneal sarcomatous mesothelioma as an unusual etiology of intestinal obstruction and high-protein ascites in an otherwise healthy man. This rare disorder is diagnosed based on immunohistochemistry, which is necessary to differentiate it from other rare sarcomatous carcinomas. In many cases, localized disease can be treated to cure with surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Advanced disease is often treated for palliation of symptoms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus