Limits...
Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration.

Santiago Rivera L, Figueroa Rivera I, Toro DH, Gutierrez J, Acosta E - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Bottom Line: Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia.Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease.We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, VA Caribbean Healthcare System, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

ABSTRACT
Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

T1 MRI post-contrast portal venous phase (A) 1 month after discharge showing significant improvement of multiple hypointense lesions, and (B) 2 months after discharge showing complete resolution of the hepatic lesions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612763&req=5

Figure 3: T1 MRI post-contrast portal venous phase (A) 1 month after discharge showing significant improvement of multiple hypointense lesions, and (B) 2 months after discharge showing complete resolution of the hepatic lesions.

Mentions: One month later both the eosinophilia and liver tests were normal. A follow-up abdominal MRI showed significant improvement of the multiple, small hepatic lesions and resolution of lymphadenopathy (Figure 3). Follow-up MRI 2 months later demonstrated complete resolution of the multiple scattered hepatic lesions on the basis of known aseptic eosinophilic infiltration (Figure 3).


Eosinophilic Liver Infiltration.

Santiago Rivera L, Figueroa Rivera I, Toro DH, Gutierrez J, Acosta E - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

T1 MRI post-contrast portal venous phase (A) 1 month after discharge showing significant improvement of multiple hypointense lesions, and (B) 2 months after discharge showing complete resolution of the hepatic lesions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612763&req=5

Figure 3: T1 MRI post-contrast portal venous phase (A) 1 month after discharge showing significant improvement of multiple hypointense lesions, and (B) 2 months after discharge showing complete resolution of the hepatic lesions.
Mentions: One month later both the eosinophilia and liver tests were normal. A follow-up abdominal MRI showed significant improvement of the multiple, small hepatic lesions and resolution of lymphadenopathy (Figure 3). Follow-up MRI 2 months later demonstrated complete resolution of the multiple scattered hepatic lesions on the basis of known aseptic eosinophilic infiltration (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia.Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease.We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Gastroenterology, VA Caribbean Healthcare System, San Juan, Puerto Rico.

ABSTRACT
Eosinophilic liver infiltration is a commonly encountered focal eosinophil-related inflammation with or without necrosis, which can be seen on computed tomography (CT) in the presence of peripheral eosinophilia. Although this entity has a relatively benign course, it is related to numerable conditions for which diagnosis may be challenging and requires substantial diagnostic work-up for proper management and care of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with a 1-week history of right upper quadrant abdominal pain with multiple ill-defined liver hypodensities associated with significant eosinophilia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus