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Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection.

Roginsky G, Mazulis A, Ecanow JS, Ehrenpreis ED - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Bottom Line: CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP.Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later.In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL.

ABSTRACT
We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Initial CT with (A) mesenteric panniculitis and (B) mesenteric lymph nodes.
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Figure 1: Initial CT with (A) mesenteric panniculitis and (B) mesenteric lymph nodes.

Mentions: Due to persistent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, the patient had an abdominal CT scan on hospital day 2 that revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP (Figure 1). The patient was treated for presumed traveler's diarrhea with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for 10 days, and was discharged on hospital day 3. Subsequently, his stool tested positive for pan-antibiotic susceptible Vibrio cholerae. The patient reported that his abdominal pain persisted for 1 month and diarrhea was present for 2 months. Follow-up CT 8 months after initial presentation indicated complete resolution of MP (Figure 2).


Mesenteric Panniculitis Associated With Vibrio cholerae Infection.

Roginsky G, Mazulis A, Ecanow JS, Ehrenpreis ED - ACG Case Rep J (2015)

Initial CT with (A) mesenteric panniculitis and (B) mesenteric lymph nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612756&req=5

Figure 1: Initial CT with (A) mesenteric panniculitis and (B) mesenteric lymph nodes.
Mentions: Due to persistent abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, the patient had an abdominal CT scan on hospital day 2 that revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP (Figure 1). The patient was treated for presumed traveler's diarrhea with ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for 10 days, and was discharged on hospital day 3. Subsequently, his stool tested positive for pan-antibiotic susceptible Vibrio cholerae. The patient reported that his abdominal pain persisted for 1 month and diarrhea was present for 2 months. Follow-up CT 8 months after initial presentation indicated complete resolution of MP (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP.Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later.In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL.

ABSTRACT
We report the first case of acute Vibrio cholerae infection with computed tomography (CT) changes consistent with mesenteric panniculitis (MP). A 78-year-old Indian man returned from overseas travel with progressively severe nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and watery diarrhea. His stool tested positive twice for Vibrio cholerae. CT revealed prominent lymph nodes and a hazy mesentery consistent with MP. Antibiotic treatment resulted in complete resolution of MP on follow-up CT 8 months later. In the setting of Vibrio cholerae infection, the CT finding of MP appears to be the result of a immunologically mediated reactive inflammatory disorder of the mesentery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus