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Post-mortem brain pathology is related to declining respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults.

Buchman AS, Yu L, Wilson RS, Dawe RJ, VanderHorst V, Schneider JA, Bennett DA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Nigral neuronal loss was associated with the person-specific decline in SPI (Estimate, -0.016 unit/year, S.E. 0.006, p = 0.009) and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 4%.By contrast, Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (Estimate, -0.030 unit/year, S.E. 0.009, p < 0.001) and macroscopic infarcts (-0.033 unit/year, S.E., 0.011, p = 0.003) were associated with the person-specific decline in RMS and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 7%.These results suggest that brain pathology is associated with the rate of declining respiratory function in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL, USA ; Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Damage to brain structures which constitute the distributed neural network that integrates respiratory muscle and pulmonary functions, can impair adequate ventilation and its volitional control. We tested the hypothesis that the level of brain pathology in older adults is associated with declining respiratory function measured during life. 1,409 older adults had annual testing with spirometry (SPI) and respiratory muscle strength (RMS) based on maximal inspiratory and maximal expiratory pressures (MEPs). Those who died underwent structured brain autopsy. On average, during 5 years of follow-up, SPI and RMS showed progressive decline which was moderately correlated (ρ = 0.57, p < 0.001). Among decedents (N = 447), indices of brain neuropathologies showed differential associations with declining SPI and RMS. Nigral neuronal loss was associated with the person-specific decline in SPI (Estimate, -0.016 unit/year, S.E. 0.006, p = 0.009) and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 4%. By contrast, Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (Estimate, -0.030 unit/year, S.E. 0.009, p < 0.001) and macroscopic infarcts (-0.033 unit/year, S.E., 0.011, p = 0.003) were associated with the person-specific decline in RMS and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 7%. These results suggest that brain pathology is associated with the rate of declining respiratory function in older adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Annual rates of change in SPI and RMS. On the left is a two-dimensional histogram of annual rates of change in SPI and RMS estimated by simultaneous random effects model (Table 2). The figure on the right depicts the density of the number of participants shown in the two dimensional histogram with yellow showing increased density compared to the shades of red. X axis shows change in SPI and Y axis shows the change in RMS. In both portions of the figure, each point illustrates the person-specific change in both aspects of respiratory function. As can be seen on the right, nearly all values are less than zero, for SPI and RMS since both declined in nearly all cases.
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Figure 2: Annual rates of change in SPI and RMS. On the left is a two-dimensional histogram of annual rates of change in SPI and RMS estimated by simultaneous random effects model (Table 2). The figure on the right depicts the density of the number of participants shown in the two dimensional histogram with yellow showing increased density compared to the shades of red. X axis shows change in SPI and Y axis shows the change in RMS. In both portions of the figure, each point illustrates the person-specific change in both aspects of respiratory function. As can be seen on the right, nearly all values are less than zero, for SPI and RMS since both declined in nearly all cases.

Mentions: Person-specific rates of change of SPI and RMS was moderately correlated (Table 2). Figure 2 is a two-dimensional histogram of the model derived annual rates of change in SPI and RMS (left), and the corresponding density map (right). The figures highlight the relationship between declining SPI and RMS.


Post-mortem brain pathology is related to declining respiratory function in community-dwelling older adults.

Buchman AS, Yu L, Wilson RS, Dawe RJ, VanderHorst V, Schneider JA, Bennett DA - Front Aging Neurosci (2015)

Annual rates of change in SPI and RMS. On the left is a two-dimensional histogram of annual rates of change in SPI and RMS estimated by simultaneous random effects model (Table 2). The figure on the right depicts the density of the number of participants shown in the two dimensional histogram with yellow showing increased density compared to the shades of red. X axis shows change in SPI and Y axis shows the change in RMS. In both portions of the figure, each point illustrates the person-specific change in both aspects of respiratory function. As can be seen on the right, nearly all values are less than zero, for SPI and RMS since both declined in nearly all cases.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612667&req=5

Figure 2: Annual rates of change in SPI and RMS. On the left is a two-dimensional histogram of annual rates of change in SPI and RMS estimated by simultaneous random effects model (Table 2). The figure on the right depicts the density of the number of participants shown in the two dimensional histogram with yellow showing increased density compared to the shades of red. X axis shows change in SPI and Y axis shows the change in RMS. In both portions of the figure, each point illustrates the person-specific change in both aspects of respiratory function. As can be seen on the right, nearly all values are less than zero, for SPI and RMS since both declined in nearly all cases.
Mentions: Person-specific rates of change of SPI and RMS was moderately correlated (Table 2). Figure 2 is a two-dimensional histogram of the model derived annual rates of change in SPI and RMS (left), and the corresponding density map (right). The figures highlight the relationship between declining SPI and RMS.

Bottom Line: Nigral neuronal loss was associated with the person-specific decline in SPI (Estimate, -0.016 unit/year, S.E. 0.006, p = 0.009) and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 4%.By contrast, Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (Estimate, -0.030 unit/year, S.E. 0.009, p < 0.001) and macroscopic infarcts (-0.033 unit/year, S.E., 0.011, p = 0.003) were associated with the person-specific decline in RMS and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 7%.These results suggest that brain pathology is associated with the rate of declining respiratory function in older adults.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL, USA ; Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center Chicago, IL, USA.

ABSTRACT
Damage to brain structures which constitute the distributed neural network that integrates respiratory muscle and pulmonary functions, can impair adequate ventilation and its volitional control. We tested the hypothesis that the level of brain pathology in older adults is associated with declining respiratory function measured during life. 1,409 older adults had annual testing with spirometry (SPI) and respiratory muscle strength (RMS) based on maximal inspiratory and maximal expiratory pressures (MEPs). Those who died underwent structured brain autopsy. On average, during 5 years of follow-up, SPI and RMS showed progressive decline which was moderately correlated (ρ = 0.57, p < 0.001). Among decedents (N = 447), indices of brain neuropathologies showed differential associations with declining SPI and RMS. Nigral neuronal loss was associated with the person-specific decline in SPI (Estimate, -0.016 unit/year, S.E. 0.006, p = 0.009) and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 4%. By contrast, Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology (Estimate, -0.030 unit/year, S.E. 0.009, p < 0.001) and macroscopic infarcts (-0.033 unit/year, S.E., 0.011, p = 0.003) were associated with the person-specific decline in RMS and reduction of the slope variance was equal to 7%. These results suggest that brain pathology is associated with the rate of declining respiratory function in older adults.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus