Limits...
Many faces, one rule: the role of perceptual expertise in infants' sequential rule learning.

Bulf H, Brenna V, Valenza E, Johnson SP, Turati C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Rule learning is a mechanism that allows infants to recognize and generalize rule-like patterns, such as ABB or ABA.Although infants are better at learning rules from speech vs. non-speech, rule learning can be applied also to frequently experienced visual stimuli, suggesting that perceptual expertise with material to be learned is critical in enhancing rule learning abilities.This finding supports the idea that perceptual expertise can modulate 7-month-olds' abilities to detect rule-like patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Psicologia, University of Milano-Bicocca Milano, Italy ; Milan Center of Neuroscience (NeuroMI) Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Rule learning is a mechanism that allows infants to recognize and generalize rule-like patterns, such as ABB or ABA. Although infants are better at learning rules from speech vs. non-speech, rule learning can be applied also to frequently experienced visual stimuli, suggesting that perceptual expertise with material to be learned is critical in enhancing rule learning abilities. Yet infants' rule learning has never been investigated using one of the most commonly experienced visual stimulus category available in infants' environment, i.e., faces. Here, we investigate 7-month-olds' ability to extract rule-like patterns from sequences composed of upright faces and compared their results to those of infants who viewed inverted faces, which presumably are encountered far less frequently than upright faces. Infants were habituated with face triads in either an ABA or ABB condition followed by a test phase with ABA and ABB triads composed of faces that differed from those showed during habituation. When upright faces were used, infants generalized the pattern presented during habituation to include the new face identities showed during testing, but when inverted faces were presented, infants failed to extract the rule. This finding supports the idea that perceptual expertise can modulate 7-month-olds' abilities to detect rule-like patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Examples of the stimuli used during the habituation and test phases.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612650&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used during the habituation and test phases.

Mentions: Upright faces were color photographs of 12 female adult faces of Caucasian origin, all displaying a full-front neutral expression with open eyes. The images were taken from the Radboud Faces Database (Langner et al., 2010). Using the software Adobe Photoshop, face images were cropped maintaining some external features like ears and hair, and pasted on a gray background (Figure 1). When viewed from approximately 60 cm, adult faces measured 19° in height and 14° in width. Inverted faces were the same 12 female faces turned upside-down by 180°.


Many faces, one rule: the role of perceptual expertise in infants' sequential rule learning.

Bulf H, Brenna V, Valenza E, Johnson SP, Turati C - Front Psychol (2015)

Examples of the stimuli used during the habituation and test phases.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612650&req=5

Figure 1: Examples of the stimuli used during the habituation and test phases.
Mentions: Upright faces were color photographs of 12 female adult faces of Caucasian origin, all displaying a full-front neutral expression with open eyes. The images were taken from the Radboud Faces Database (Langner et al., 2010). Using the software Adobe Photoshop, face images were cropped maintaining some external features like ears and hair, and pasted on a gray background (Figure 1). When viewed from approximately 60 cm, adult faces measured 19° in height and 14° in width. Inverted faces were the same 12 female faces turned upside-down by 180°.

Bottom Line: Rule learning is a mechanism that allows infants to recognize and generalize rule-like patterns, such as ABB or ABA.Although infants are better at learning rules from speech vs. non-speech, rule learning can be applied also to frequently experienced visual stimuli, suggesting that perceptual expertise with material to be learned is critical in enhancing rule learning abilities.This finding supports the idea that perceptual expertise can modulate 7-month-olds' abilities to detect rule-like patterns.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dipartimento di Psicologia, University of Milano-Bicocca Milano, Italy ; Milan Center of Neuroscience (NeuroMI) Milano, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Rule learning is a mechanism that allows infants to recognize and generalize rule-like patterns, such as ABB or ABA. Although infants are better at learning rules from speech vs. non-speech, rule learning can be applied also to frequently experienced visual stimuli, suggesting that perceptual expertise with material to be learned is critical in enhancing rule learning abilities. Yet infants' rule learning has never been investigated using one of the most commonly experienced visual stimulus category available in infants' environment, i.e., faces. Here, we investigate 7-month-olds' ability to extract rule-like patterns from sequences composed of upright faces and compared their results to those of infants who viewed inverted faces, which presumably are encountered far less frequently than upright faces. Infants were habituated with face triads in either an ABA or ABB condition followed by a test phase with ABA and ABB triads composed of faces that differed from those showed during habituation. When upright faces were used, infants generalized the pattern presented during habituation to include the new face identities showed during testing, but when inverted faces were presented, infants failed to extract the rule. This finding supports the idea that perceptual expertise can modulate 7-month-olds' abilities to detect rule-like patterns.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus