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The contribution of individual psychological resilience in determining the professional quality of life of Australian nurses.

Hegney DG, Rees CS, Eley R, Osseiran-Moisson R, Francis K - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: RESULTS of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS.RESULTS confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life.Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse's professional quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Southern Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Research Topic: The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of trait negative affect and individual psychological resilience in explaining the professional quality of life of nurses.

Materials and methods: One thousand, seven hundred and forty-three Australian nurses from the public, private, and aged care sectors completed an online Qualtrics survey. The survey collected demographic data as well as measures of depression, anxiety and stress, trait negative affect, resilience, and professional quality of life.

Results: Significant positive relationships were observed between anxiety, depression and stress, trait negative affectivity, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (compassion fatigue). Significant negative relationships were observed between each of the aforementioned variables and resilience and compassion satisfaction (CS). RESULTS of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS.

Conclusion: RESULTS confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life. Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse's professional quality of life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

ICWR1 Workforce Resilience Model (Rees et al., 2015).
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Figure 1: ICWR1 Workforce Resilience Model (Rees et al., 2015).

Mentions: Numerous studies have now reported high rates of stress-related conditions such as burnout, anxiety and depression, and STS among the nursing workforce as well as significant relationships among these variables. However, few studies have included a measure of resilience and examined the relationship between resilience and psychological outcomes. Furthermore, it is imperative that efforts are made to test the relative importance of resilience in explaining psychological functioning when examined alongside other key individual difference variables. With this in mind, Rees et al. (2015) recently put forward a theoretical model of individual resilience in the workplace that attempts to map essential key individual difference variables that together with resilience that may explain psychological functioning. In this model (see Figure 1) resilience is regarded as a critical individual difference factor that heavily influences the subsequent psychological functioning of a person. As can be seen in the model, a number of key variables are proposed as having a significant relationship with psychological functioning. These variables include Neuroticism, Mindfulness, Self-Efficacy, and Coping. Each of these variables has previously been shown to relate to levels of psychological functioning. For example, studies have shown that a high level of Neuroticism (also known as Trait Negative Affect) is consistently related to negative psychological outcomes such as high levels of depression and anxiety (Drury et al., 2014; Rees et al., 2014; Craigie et al., 2015). Similarly, low levels of mindfulness, self-efficacy, and adaptive coping behaviors have also been found to relate to negative psychological outcomes (Saks, 1994; Arch and Craske, 2010; Li and Nishikawa, 2012).


The contribution of individual psychological resilience in determining the professional quality of life of Australian nurses.

Hegney DG, Rees CS, Eley R, Osseiran-Moisson R, Francis K - Front Psychol (2015)

ICWR1 Workforce Resilience Model (Rees et al., 2015).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612648&req=5

Figure 1: ICWR1 Workforce Resilience Model (Rees et al., 2015).
Mentions: Numerous studies have now reported high rates of stress-related conditions such as burnout, anxiety and depression, and STS among the nursing workforce as well as significant relationships among these variables. However, few studies have included a measure of resilience and examined the relationship between resilience and psychological outcomes. Furthermore, it is imperative that efforts are made to test the relative importance of resilience in explaining psychological functioning when examined alongside other key individual difference variables. With this in mind, Rees et al. (2015) recently put forward a theoretical model of individual resilience in the workplace that attempts to map essential key individual difference variables that together with resilience that may explain psychological functioning. In this model (see Figure 1) resilience is regarded as a critical individual difference factor that heavily influences the subsequent psychological functioning of a person. As can be seen in the model, a number of key variables are proposed as having a significant relationship with psychological functioning. These variables include Neuroticism, Mindfulness, Self-Efficacy, and Coping. Each of these variables has previously been shown to relate to levels of psychological functioning. For example, studies have shown that a high level of Neuroticism (also known as Trait Negative Affect) is consistently related to negative psychological outcomes such as high levels of depression and anxiety (Drury et al., 2014; Rees et al., 2014; Craigie et al., 2015). Similarly, low levels of mindfulness, self-efficacy, and adaptive coping behaviors have also been found to relate to negative psychological outcomes (Saks, 1994; Arch and Craske, 2010; Li and Nishikawa, 2012).

Bottom Line: RESULTS of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS.RESULTS confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life.Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse's professional quality of life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Southern Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Research Topic: The aim of this study was to determine the relative contribution of trait negative affect and individual psychological resilience in explaining the professional quality of life of nurses.

Materials and methods: One thousand, seven hundred and forty-three Australian nurses from the public, private, and aged care sectors completed an online Qualtrics survey. The survey collected demographic data as well as measures of depression, anxiety and stress, trait negative affect, resilience, and professional quality of life.

Results: Significant positive relationships were observed between anxiety, depression and stress, trait negative affectivity, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress (compassion fatigue). Significant negative relationships were observed between each of the aforementioned variables and resilience and compassion satisfaction (CS). RESULTS of mediated regression analysis indicated that resilience partially mediates the relationship between trait negative affect and CS.

Conclusion: RESULTS confirm the importance of both trait negative affect and resilience in explaining positive aspects of professional quality of life. Importantly, resilience was confirmed as a key variable impacting levels of CS and thus a potentially important variable to target in interventions aimed at improving nurse's professional quality of life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus