Limits...
Successful crosses between fungal-resistant wild species of Arachis (section Arachis) and Arachis hypogaea.

Fávero AP, Dos Santos RF, Simpson CE, Valls JF, Vello NA - Genet. Mol. Biol. (2015)

Bottom Line: These sterile hybrids were polyploidized and five combinations produced tetraploid flowers.Next, 16 combinations were crossed between A. hypogaea and the synthetic amphidiploids, resulting in 11 different hybrid combinations.Our results confirm that it is possible to introgress resistance genes from wild species into the peanut using artificial hybridization, and that more species than previously reported can be used, thus enhancing the genetic variability in peanut genetic improvement programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is the fifth most produced oil crop worldwide. Besides lack of water, fungal diseases are the most limiting factors for the crop. Several species of Arachis are resistant to certain pests and diseases. This study aimed to successfully cross the A-genome with B-K-A genome wild species previously selected for fungal disease resistance, but that are still untested. We also aimed to polyplodize the amphihaploid chromosomes; cross the synthetic amphidiploids and A. hypogaea to introgress disease resistance genes into the cultivated peanut; and analyze pollen viability and morphological descriptors for all progenies and their parents. We selected 12 A-genome accessions as male parents and three B-genome species, one K-genome species, and one A-genome species as female parents. Of the 26 distinct cross combinations, 13 different interspecific AB-genome and three AA-genome hybrids were obtained. These sterile hybrids were polyploidized and five combinations produced tetraploid flowers. Next, 16 combinations were crossed between A. hypogaea and the synthetic amphidiploids, resulting in 11 different hybrid combinations. Our results confirm that it is possible to introgress resistance genes from wild species into the peanut using artificial hybridization, and that more species than previously reported can be used, thus enhancing the genetic variability in peanut genetic improvement programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PCA of F1 hybrids obtained by crossing between amphidiploids and A. hypogaea, and their parents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612608&req=5

f03: PCA of F1 hybrids obtained by crossing between amphidiploids and A. hypogaea, and their parents.

Mentions: The mean morphological data on four male parents, three female parents, and seven hybrid combinations were used in principal component analysis (Figure 3). Plants of the other hybrid combinations and one amphidiploid (A. gregoryi x A. villosa) were too poor in condition to be included in the analysis. Of the 23 morphological traits evaluated, 15 were selected as the most important for distinguishing genotypes, i.e., they explained a great part of the total variance observed in PC1 (46.68%). Likewise, in studying Eleusine coracana, 11 out of 29 traits should be discarded from analysis (Hussaini et al., 1997). These discarded traits were mostly vegetative and highly affected by environmental factors, but the reproductive data associated with panicle traits were less affected.


Successful crosses between fungal-resistant wild species of Arachis (section Arachis) and Arachis hypogaea.

Fávero AP, Dos Santos RF, Simpson CE, Valls JF, Vello NA - Genet. Mol. Biol. (2015)

PCA of F1 hybrids obtained by crossing between amphidiploids and A. hypogaea, and their parents.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612608&req=5

f03: PCA of F1 hybrids obtained by crossing between amphidiploids and A. hypogaea, and their parents.
Mentions: The mean morphological data on four male parents, three female parents, and seven hybrid combinations were used in principal component analysis (Figure 3). Plants of the other hybrid combinations and one amphidiploid (A. gregoryi x A. villosa) were too poor in condition to be included in the analysis. Of the 23 morphological traits evaluated, 15 were selected as the most important for distinguishing genotypes, i.e., they explained a great part of the total variance observed in PC1 (46.68%). Likewise, in studying Eleusine coracana, 11 out of 29 traits should be discarded from analysis (Hussaini et al., 1997). These discarded traits were mostly vegetative and highly affected by environmental factors, but the reproductive data associated with panicle traits were less affected.

Bottom Line: These sterile hybrids were polyploidized and five combinations produced tetraploid flowers.Next, 16 combinations were crossed between A. hypogaea and the synthetic amphidiploids, resulting in 11 different hybrid combinations.Our results confirm that it is possible to introgress resistance genes from wild species into the peanut using artificial hybridization, and that more species than previously reported can be used, thus enhancing the genetic variability in peanut genetic improvement programs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Embrapa Pecuária Sudeste, São Carlos, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) is the fifth most produced oil crop worldwide. Besides lack of water, fungal diseases are the most limiting factors for the crop. Several species of Arachis are resistant to certain pests and diseases. This study aimed to successfully cross the A-genome with B-K-A genome wild species previously selected for fungal disease resistance, but that are still untested. We also aimed to polyplodize the amphihaploid chromosomes; cross the synthetic amphidiploids and A. hypogaea to introgress disease resistance genes into the cultivated peanut; and analyze pollen viability and morphological descriptors for all progenies and their parents. We selected 12 A-genome accessions as male parents and three B-genome species, one K-genome species, and one A-genome species as female parents. Of the 26 distinct cross combinations, 13 different interspecific AB-genome and three AA-genome hybrids were obtained. These sterile hybrids were polyploidized and five combinations produced tetraploid flowers. Next, 16 combinations were crossed between A. hypogaea and the synthetic amphidiploids, resulting in 11 different hybrid combinations. Our results confirm that it is possible to introgress resistance genes from wild species into the peanut using artificial hybridization, and that more species than previously reported can be used, thus enhancing the genetic variability in peanut genetic improvement programs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus