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Effects of salinity on the growth, physiology and relevant gene expression of an annual halophyte grown from heteromorphic seeds.

Cao J, Lv XY, Chen L, Xing JJ, Lan HY - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: Results showed that osmolytes (proline and glycinebetaine) were significantly increased and that excess reactive oxygen species ([Formula: see text] H2O2) produced under high salinity were scavenged by increased levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and corresponding antioxidants (ascorbic acid and glutathione).Moreover, enhancement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at high salt intensity had a positive effect on photosynthesis.In conclusion, we found that high salinity induced the same active physiological responses in plants from heteromorphic seeds of S. aralocaspica, there was no carry-over of seed heteromorphism to plants: all the descendants required salinity for optimal growth and adaptation to their natural habitat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Biological Resources and Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, China.

No MeSH data available.


Changes of Na+, K+ and WC in leaves during long-term NaCl treatment. (A) Na+, (B) K+, (C) K+/Na+ ratio and (D) WC. F-values are given when significance levels are reached (S, salt; ST, seed type; *P< 0.05, ***P< 0.001). Bars with different uppercase letters indicate significant differences (P< 0.05) according to Tukey's test. Values are means ± SE of four replicates. Bl, black seed; Br, brown seed.
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PLV112F2: Changes of Na+, K+ and WC in leaves during long-term NaCl treatment. (A) Na+, (B) K+, (C) K+/Na+ ratio and (D) WC. F-values are given when significance levels are reached (S, salt; ST, seed type; *P< 0.05, ***P< 0.001). Bars with different uppercase letters indicate significant differences (P< 0.05) according to Tukey's test. Values are means ± SE of four replicates. Bl, black seed; Br, brown seed.

Mentions: With increasing salt concentration, plants from the two seed morphs showed a significantly greater accumulation of Na+ in the leaf than that of plants grown without salt (F3,24 = 159.6, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2A). On the other hand, salt treatment induced a significant decrease of K+, which was greater at 300 and 500 mM NaCl treatments than at lower concentrations (F3,24 = 72.54, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2B). As a consequence, the K+/Na+ ratios in both plants were reduced (F3,24 = 182.5, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2C). Similarly, the WC was affected with elevated salt level (F3,24 = 46.66, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2D). Plants from both types of seeds showed no significant difference (F1,24 = 1.728, P = 0.2011 for Na+; F1,24 = 2.524, P = 0.1252 for K+) in Na+ and K+ concentrations, although both the K+/Na+ ratios (F1,24 = 16.7, P = 0.0004) and WC (F1,24 = 4.398, P = 0.0467) did differ between seed morphs.Figure 2.


Effects of salinity on the growth, physiology and relevant gene expression of an annual halophyte grown from heteromorphic seeds.

Cao J, Lv XY, Chen L, Xing JJ, Lan HY - AoB Plants (2015)

Changes of Na+, K+ and WC in leaves during long-term NaCl treatment. (A) Na+, (B) K+, (C) K+/Na+ ratio and (D) WC. F-values are given when significance levels are reached (S, salt; ST, seed type; *P< 0.05, ***P< 0.001). Bars with different uppercase letters indicate significant differences (P< 0.05) according to Tukey's test. Values are means ± SE of four replicates. Bl, black seed; Br, brown seed.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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PLV112F2: Changes of Na+, K+ and WC in leaves during long-term NaCl treatment. (A) Na+, (B) K+, (C) K+/Na+ ratio and (D) WC. F-values are given when significance levels are reached (S, salt; ST, seed type; *P< 0.05, ***P< 0.001). Bars with different uppercase letters indicate significant differences (P< 0.05) according to Tukey's test. Values are means ± SE of four replicates. Bl, black seed; Br, brown seed.
Mentions: With increasing salt concentration, plants from the two seed morphs showed a significantly greater accumulation of Na+ in the leaf than that of plants grown without salt (F3,24 = 159.6, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2A). On the other hand, salt treatment induced a significant decrease of K+, which was greater at 300 and 500 mM NaCl treatments than at lower concentrations (F3,24 = 72.54, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2B). As a consequence, the K+/Na+ ratios in both plants were reduced (F3,24 = 182.5, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2C). Similarly, the WC was affected with elevated salt level (F3,24 = 46.66, P< 0.0001) (Fig. 2D). Plants from both types of seeds showed no significant difference (F1,24 = 1.728, P = 0.2011 for Na+; F1,24 = 2.524, P = 0.1252 for K+) in Na+ and K+ concentrations, although both the K+/Na+ ratios (F1,24 = 16.7, P = 0.0004) and WC (F1,24 = 4.398, P = 0.0467) did differ between seed morphs.Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Results showed that osmolytes (proline and glycinebetaine) were significantly increased and that excess reactive oxygen species ([Formula: see text] H2O2) produced under high salinity were scavenged by increased levels of antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) and corresponding antioxidants (ascorbic acid and glutathione).Moreover, enhancement of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity at high salt intensity had a positive effect on photosynthesis.In conclusion, we found that high salinity induced the same active physiological responses in plants from heteromorphic seeds of S. aralocaspica, there was no carry-over of seed heteromorphism to plants: all the descendants required salinity for optimal growth and adaptation to their natural habitat.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Biological Resources and Genetic Engineering, College of Life Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi 830046, China.

No MeSH data available.