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Long-term ecology resolves the timing, region of origin and process of establishment for a disputed alien tree.

Wilmshurst JM, McGlone MS, Turney CS - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: This marine subsidy has fuelled the rapid growth of O. lyallii and allowed this tree to be competitive against the maritime communities it has replaced.Although endemic to the New Zealand region, our evidence suggests that O. lyallii is alien to the Auckland Islands.Although such 'native' aliens can pose unique management challenges on islands, in this instance we suggest that ongoing monitoring with no control is an appropriate management action, as O. lyallii appears to pose minimal risk to ecological integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research, PO Box 69040, Lincoln 7640, New Zealand School of Environment, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand wilmshurstj@landcareresearch.co.nz.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Summary percentage pollen record from Ewing Island, with pollen taxa plotted against depth, with the calibrated age scale in years AD shown on the secondary axis. Grey zone shows time of earliest sealing activity in the region (1807–10).
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PLV104F5: Summary percentage pollen record from Ewing Island, with pollen taxa plotted against depth, with the calibrated age scale in years AD shown on the secondary axis. Grey zone shows time of earliest sealing activity in the region (1807–10).

Mentions: The radiocarbon dates (Table 1) and age-depth model for this core [see Supporting Information—Table S2 and Fig. S4] indicate peat accumulation began on Ewing Island c. 10 000 cal year before the present. The base of our pollen record (Fig. 5) starts at c. 1600 cal year before the present (c. 400 cal year AD), at which time the site was covered with a coastal maritime community dominated by the shrub V. elliptica, with grasses, macrophyllous forbs S. polaris and A. latifolia, sedges, and abundant ground ferns. The low levels of Metrosideros pollen throughout the core suggests that this forest was limited to the more protected interior of the island behind the coastal belt of maritime vegetation. Low counts of charcoal (<5 fragments per 1 mL of peat) are first recorded in the peat profile at the top of the uninvaded zone, just prior to c. 1800 cal year AD but probably reflect reworking as a consequence of site disturbance during the European era (also supported by age inversion at 33 cm—Table 1).Figure 5.


Long-term ecology resolves the timing, region of origin and process of establishment for a disputed alien tree.

Wilmshurst JM, McGlone MS, Turney CS - AoB Plants (2015)

Summary percentage pollen record from Ewing Island, with pollen taxa plotted against depth, with the calibrated age scale in years AD shown on the secondary axis. Grey zone shows time of earliest sealing activity in the region (1807–10).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612295&req=5

PLV104F5: Summary percentage pollen record from Ewing Island, with pollen taxa plotted against depth, with the calibrated age scale in years AD shown on the secondary axis. Grey zone shows time of earliest sealing activity in the region (1807–10).
Mentions: The radiocarbon dates (Table 1) and age-depth model for this core [see Supporting Information—Table S2 and Fig. S4] indicate peat accumulation began on Ewing Island c. 10 000 cal year before the present. The base of our pollen record (Fig. 5) starts at c. 1600 cal year before the present (c. 400 cal year AD), at which time the site was covered with a coastal maritime community dominated by the shrub V. elliptica, with grasses, macrophyllous forbs S. polaris and A. latifolia, sedges, and abundant ground ferns. The low levels of Metrosideros pollen throughout the core suggests that this forest was limited to the more protected interior of the island behind the coastal belt of maritime vegetation. Low counts of charcoal (<5 fragments per 1 mL of peat) are first recorded in the peat profile at the top of the uninvaded zone, just prior to c. 1800 cal year AD but probably reflect reworking as a consequence of site disturbance during the European era (also supported by age inversion at 33 cm—Table 1).Figure 5.

Bottom Line: This marine subsidy has fuelled the rapid growth of O. lyallii and allowed this tree to be competitive against the maritime communities it has replaced.Although endemic to the New Zealand region, our evidence suggests that O. lyallii is alien to the Auckland Islands.Although such 'native' aliens can pose unique management challenges on islands, in this instance we suggest that ongoing monitoring with no control is an appropriate management action, as O. lyallii appears to pose minimal risk to ecological integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research, PO Box 69040, Lincoln 7640, New Zealand School of Environment, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand wilmshurstj@landcareresearch.co.nz.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus