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Long-term ecology resolves the timing, region of origin and process of establishment for a disputed alien tree.

Wilmshurst JM, McGlone MS, Turney CS - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: This marine subsidy has fuelled the rapid growth of O. lyallii and allowed this tree to be competitive against the maritime communities it has replaced.Although endemic to the New Zealand region, our evidence suggests that O. lyallii is alien to the Auckland Islands.Although such 'native' aliens can pose unique management challenges on islands, in this instance we suggest that ongoing monitoring with no control is an appropriate management action, as O. lyallii appears to pose minimal risk to ecological integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research, PO Box 69040, Lincoln 7640, New Zealand School of Environment, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand wilmshurstj@landcareresearch.co.nz.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map (left) showing the location of subantarctic Auckland Islands in relation to the South Island of New Zealand, and islands (circled) where O. lyallii currently occurs in New Zealand, and (right) the main O. lyallii populations on the north-eastern Auckland Islands (boxed area enlarged from map on left).
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PLV104F1: Map (left) showing the location of subantarctic Auckland Islands in relation to the South Island of New Zealand, and islands (circled) where O. lyallii currently occurs in New Zealand, and (right) the main O. lyallii populations on the north-eastern Auckland Islands (boxed area enlarged from map on left).

Mentions: Well-dated, long-term and high-temporal resolution reconstructions of former vegetation composition can also show how, and under what ecological and environmental conditions, a species manages to invade and establish, and can determine the subsequent speed and spatial extent of spread (Gillson et al. 2008). The entire process of establishment and expansion can be documented through to the present, and then integrated with botanical or historical observations to develop a rich temporal and spatial perspective on an invasion, providing valuable insights for management practice and policy. We use this approach here to address the controversial status of a tree daisy Olearia lyallii (Asteraceae) on the Auckland Islands, a subantarctic island group in the New Zealand archipelago (Fig. 1). This tree is endemic to the New Zealand flora, but its origin and appropriate management on the Auckland Islands remains uncertain (Campbell and Rudge 1976; Lee et al. 1991; DOC 1998). By integrating palaeoecological records with historical evidence (written and photographic) and previous ecological investigations, we establish the history of O. lyallii arrival, establishment and subsequent spread on these islands. We also address the unresolved status of O. lyallii on the Auckland Islands according to the Projected Dispersal Envelope concept of Webber and Scott (2012) and determine whether its history and ecological role suggests that it poses a threat to the ecological integrity of the Auckland Island ecosystems.Figure 1.


Long-term ecology resolves the timing, region of origin and process of establishment for a disputed alien tree.

Wilmshurst JM, McGlone MS, Turney CS - AoB Plants (2015)

Map (left) showing the location of subantarctic Auckland Islands in relation to the South Island of New Zealand, and islands (circled) where O. lyallii currently occurs in New Zealand, and (right) the main O. lyallii populations on the north-eastern Auckland Islands (boxed area enlarged from map on left).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4612295&req=5

PLV104F1: Map (left) showing the location of subantarctic Auckland Islands in relation to the South Island of New Zealand, and islands (circled) where O. lyallii currently occurs in New Zealand, and (right) the main O. lyallii populations on the north-eastern Auckland Islands (boxed area enlarged from map on left).
Mentions: Well-dated, long-term and high-temporal resolution reconstructions of former vegetation composition can also show how, and under what ecological and environmental conditions, a species manages to invade and establish, and can determine the subsequent speed and spatial extent of spread (Gillson et al. 2008). The entire process of establishment and expansion can be documented through to the present, and then integrated with botanical or historical observations to develop a rich temporal and spatial perspective on an invasion, providing valuable insights for management practice and policy. We use this approach here to address the controversial status of a tree daisy Olearia lyallii (Asteraceae) on the Auckland Islands, a subantarctic island group in the New Zealand archipelago (Fig. 1). This tree is endemic to the New Zealand flora, but its origin and appropriate management on the Auckland Islands remains uncertain (Campbell and Rudge 1976; Lee et al. 1991; DOC 1998). By integrating palaeoecological records with historical evidence (written and photographic) and previous ecological investigations, we establish the history of O. lyallii arrival, establishment and subsequent spread on these islands. We also address the unresolved status of O. lyallii on the Auckland Islands according to the Projected Dispersal Envelope concept of Webber and Scott (2012) and determine whether its history and ecological role suggests that it poses a threat to the ecological integrity of the Auckland Island ecosystems.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: This marine subsidy has fuelled the rapid growth of O. lyallii and allowed this tree to be competitive against the maritime communities it has replaced.Although endemic to the New Zealand region, our evidence suggests that O. lyallii is alien to the Auckland Islands.Although such 'native' aliens can pose unique management challenges on islands, in this instance we suggest that ongoing monitoring with no control is an appropriate management action, as O. lyallii appears to pose minimal risk to ecological integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Landcare Research, PO Box 69040, Lincoln 7640, New Zealand School of Environment, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142, New Zealand wilmshurstj@landcareresearch.co.nz.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus